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Systems by Principle Nearby Star

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Exoplanetary Scratchpad

[SysBP Img]

Systems hierarchically arranged based on nearest star that's more significant than them.

Systems by Principle Nearby Star Web PagesEdit

Systems by Principle Nearby Star In the NewsEdit

Sample (Year)Edit

HierarchyEdit

Sirius KingdomEdit

See also Sirius Kingdom
Has 13 Known Planets in 4 systems

  • Sirius System (28.5ly; 8.6 ly) - Sirius is also known as Alpha Canis Majoris and Gliese 244. The brightest star in the sky. A hot blue-white main sequence star with a white dwarf (the "pup") orbiting it. Orbit distance varies between 8.1 and 31.5 ly and takes 50 years to navigate. The habitable zone of Star A is centered 4.25 AU from the star and may be disrupted due to the presence of Star B. Long thought to be a part of the Ursa Major Moving Group (also called the "Sirius Group"), it was found to be too young to be a member and not heading in the right direction. The brightest star within a large distance from the Sun. Star B is about the same mass as the Sun, but is almost the same size as the Earth. It may have evolved from a 5 solar massed B-type main sequence star. It is the nearest and first discovered white dwarf star. Dust has been detected from the system, probably from material sluffed off from Star B. A search in 2008 using high contrast imaging for planets within 10 Jupiter masses within 25 AU of the binary star turned up negative.
    • Kapteyn's Star System (7.5 ly) - Kapteyn's Star is also known as VZ Pic, Gl 191, HD 33793, and Cordoba Zone 5 hours 243. Kapteyn noticed that a star was missing from a catalog until its new position was found. Has the second highest proper motion of any stars. Also informally called Proxima Pictoris. Nearby large and old Red Dwarf star system and nearest Halo object thought to be a remnant of the nearest and largest global cluster, Omega Centauri, which is 16,000 ly away and shredded by the Milky way 11.5 BYA, and born while that was still a separate galaxy. 2.5 times as old as the Sun and born when the Universe was only 2 BYO. Was within 3 light years of Epsilon Eridani 31,500 years ago. Will be on the other side of the galaxy in 100 MY. Is a sub-dwarf or main sequence star. Has two planets. The first is at least a 4.5 ME Super Earth (0.16 AU) and is the oldest Potentially Habitable Planet. The second is over 7 ME and beyond the HZ (0.3 AU).

Solar PrincipalityEdit

8 Known Planets

    • Solar System (8.6 ly) - Our home star system. Contains 4 terrestrial planets, 4 gas giant planets, several dwarf planets, an asteroid belt, and a kuiper belt, around a G-Class yellow dwarf star. Contains the only known habitable planet, Earth.
      • Barnard's Star System (6.0 ly) - Barnard's Star is also known as Gliese 699 and informally as Proxima Ophiuchi. Named for the astronomer E. E. Barnard, who discovered it in 1916 and was the first to measure its proper motion. Second closest star system to the Sun and the one with the highest proper motion in the sky - due to its rapid approach to the Sun. Will get as close as 3.8 ly away in 12,000 years. A red dwarf once thought to have a planet around it found due to radial velocity method. Since disproven. A potential target for the 1970's Project Daedelus. It has been determined definitively that no Earth-sized planets orbit in its habitable zone. The nearest system without known planets. The star is very ancient 11-12 Billion Years Old, and is the nearest inactive Red Dwarf Star. It may take another 40 Billion Years before it cools to become a Black Dwarf. Astronomers were surprised to discover that it was a flare star in 2003, and dubbed it V2500 Ophiuchi.
      • Wolf 359 System (7.9 ly) - Wolf 359 is also called Gl 406, and CN Leonis and informally called Proxima Leonis. Third nearest star system to the Sun. It is one of the smallest Red Dwarf stars known and is a flare star and the M6 V spectral standard star. Its proper motion was first measured by German astronomer Max Wolf in 1917. It was the lowest mass and faintest star known until the discovery of VB 10 in 1944. Its temperature is so low that chemical compounds can exist in it, which is rare for a star. It is a relatively young star, less than a billion years old.

Alpha Centauri PrincipalityEdit

1 Known Planet

    • Alpha Centauri System (9.5 ly; 4.3 ly) - Alpha Centauri is also known as Rigil Kentaurus. A is also known as HD 128620 and HR 5459, B is HD 128621 and HR 5460, and C is Proxima Centauri. It is the nearest star system to the Sun. Contains a yellow dwarf star a little bigger than the Sun and an orange star a little smaller orbiting each other orbiting each other about the distance Uranus is from the Sun (varies from Saturn like to Neptune like), as well as a distant Red Dwarf companion Proxima that may or may not be orbiting the other two. Proxima, a small flare star, was discovered in 1915 by Robert Ines, who named it. Long suspected planet around Proxima found not to exist. As Proxima passes in front of two stars (once in 2014, again in 2016), any planets within 5 AU should be detectable via microlensing using the HST. It is known that no planets of Neptune sized mass exist within 1 AU and no Jovians with periods up to 1000 days, or transiting planets exist. First planet discovered is an Earth-massed rocky-iron planet with no atmosphere at epistellar distances around the orange dwarf star B found by HARPS. This is the least massive planet found around a sunlike star. The planet was informally and controversially named by Uwingu during a fund raising naming contest Albertus Alauda, after a participant's grandfather. Earthlike planets are not detectable in the habitable zone with present radial velocity methods. Technique for detection of planet is a source of doubt for some and it has yet to be independently verified. A team thought they might have detected a transit of this planet, but further observations showed the timing wasn't consistent. It is possible that a second further out (20.4 day period) Earth-sized planet is altering the transit times of the first. A cheap crowdfunded satellite devoted to studying this star could confirm the planets. The star was observed to be a good candidate to host a "super Habitable" planet, which would have 25% more gravity than the Earth, shallow seas, flatter landscape, higher atmospheric pressure, and the 6 BYO star would be stable for life longer. Stellar fingerprinting suggests a high probability that a planet orbits star A, due to dearth of Iron around star. Russian astronomers announced the detection of a second planet orbiting the binary pair at 80 AU with a 100 year period. The stars in the system will become markedly closer together in 2016, making observations much more difficult and one follow up failed to find it. The system is the first target for the European Cheops exoplanet space telescope. The Pale Red Dot project is dedicated to finding a planet around Proxima using dopplar spectrometry.
      • Ross 154 System (8.1 ly; 9.8 ly) - Ross 154 is also called Gliese 729 and informally Proxima Sagittarii. Nearby flare star that experiences major flares about once every 2 days. An exceptionally large red dwarf and probably young, which explains the flares. First cataloged by Frank Ross in 1925.
      • Luyten 145-141 System (10.9 ly; 15.0 ly) - L 145-141 is also known as Gliese 440, LHS 43, and WD 1142-645, and informally as Proxima Muscae. Fourth nearest white dwarf. It is likely the remains of a spectral class B main sequence star. May be a part of the Wolf 219 moving group.
      • Innes' Star System (11.2 ly; 14.7 ly) - Innes' Star is also known as Gliese (NN) 3618, L 143-23, and LHS 288. Nearby Red Dwarf with exceptionally high proper motion in Carina. Discovered by Robert Innes (1861-1933), the same astronomer who discovered Proxima Centauri. According to Wikipedia (unsourced), recent studies suggest it may harbor an unconfirmed Jupiter mass planet as small as 2.4 Jupiter masses in a 7 year orbit.
      • DENIS J081730.0-615520 System (; 16 ly assumed, nearest to Innes' Star) - DENIS J081730.0-615520 is abbreviated as DEN 0817-6155 and also known as 2MASS 08173001-6155158. It is the second nearest isolated T-Class brown dwarf to the Sun and the brightest in the sky (it had been missed before due to its proximity to the galactic plain). In the constellation Carina.It discovered in 2010 and has about 15 times the mass of Jupiter. Methane has been detected in its atmosphere.

Tau Ceti PrincipalityEdit

Has 5 Known Planets in 2 systems

    • Tau Ceti System (12.3 ly; 11.9 ly) - Tau Ceti is also known as HD 10700, HR 509, and Gl 71. The nearest single G-class yellow dwarf to the sun, somewhat smaller than the Sun. A popular science fiction subject and one of two targets of SETI-forerunner Project Ozma in the 1960s. Despite being somewhat older than the sun, it has an extensive asteroid and/or comet field 10-50 AU, with the bulk between 35 and 50 AU. It has about ten times as much material as the Sun. This would make life difficult. It is a metal deficient star, so it is thought less likely to host rocky planets. Traditional dopplar spectrometry has ruled out any large Jupiter sized planets at Jupiter like distances or closer in, which was thought to be good for any potentially habitable planets. Five candidate rocky super Earth planets were detected though using a new method of planetary detection. This method made predictions of the stellar "noise" activity that might obscure detection of a planet based on the long history of dopplar measurements done on this system. Deviations from this prediction pointed towards the existence of planets. Confirmation using more established methods is needed. These planets are labeled b through f as you go outward, span 0.1 AU to 1.35 AU, and get larger the further you go out (at least 2 ME to 6.6 ME). The outermost two are near the habitable zone and were originally hailed as possibly being the nearest and smallest known habitable planets. More recent modeling indicates they are not actually habitable though. Planet e is probably too close to the star and only in the HZ if generous assumptions are made. Planet f has probably only been in the habitable zone for about a billion years as a result of its star becoming hotter, which might make biosigns difficult to detect from Earth, considering it took 2 BY for biosigns to become detectable around the Earth. Since the star has a higher magnesium to silicon ratio than the Sun, these planets compositions could be quite different that the Solar System's. The lower mantles could be dominated with ferropericlase, which is not very viscious, which may make the rocks of the mantle flow easier than on Earth, affecting volcanism and tectonics. One of 5 PICTURE-C targets selected for sub-orbital coronograph observation.
      • YZ Ceti System (1.6 ly; 12.1 ly) - YZ Ceti is also called L 275-22 and Gl 54.1. It is a nearby Red Dwarf flare star that's only 1.6 ly from Tau Ceti.
      • Luyten 726-8 System (3.5 ly; 8.7 ly) - Luyten 726-8 is also known as Gliese 65 and Luyten 726-8 and informally Proxima Ceti. It is the 6th nearest star system to the Sun. Nearby binary star system of red dwarves a distance of 2 to 9 AU from each other. Star A is also called BL Ceti, while Star B is the most famous flare star, called UV Ceti (arch-type for UV Cetic class flare stars). In 31,500 years, it will pass within only 0.93 ly of Epsilon Eridani, which may stir up comets in any Oort Clouds in these systems. It is possibly a member of the Haydes Stream.
      • Van Maanen's Star System (6.2 ly; 14.3 ly) - Van Maanen's star is also called Gl 35 and informally Proxima Piscium. The nearest single White Dwarf star, the third discovered, and the first solitary white dwarf discovered. Has more neighboring stars within 10 ly than any other star within 20 ly of the Sun, but none of them is as close as the Alpha Centauri is from the Sun. Several inconsistent studies suggest planets, but none confirmed. A plate from 1917 was discovered that showed evidence of a consumed planet in the star, the earliest evidence for an exoplanet.
      • Giclas 158-27 System (6.8 ly; 15.3 ly) - G 158-27 is also called GJ 1002 and LHS 2. Nearby Red Dwarf in Cetus that is remarkable in that no flare activity has detected, suggesting an ancient age.
      • TZ Arietis System (7.2 ly; 14.5 ly) - TZ Arietis is also known as L 1159-16 and Gliese 83.1. Nearby Red Dwarf flare star.
      • Luyten 722-22 System (7.3 ly; 17.0 ly) - L 722-22 is also known as GJ 1005. Nearby double Red Dwarf system in Cetus.
      • Ross 780 System (10.2 ly; 8.2 ly) - Ross 780 is also known as Gl 876 and the flare star IL Aquarii. Very nearby quadruple planet system and the first Red Dwarf found to have planets. The innermost planet (d, Hot Superterran, rocky-water) was the first found rocky planet around a normal star (the first true Super-Earth, at epistellar distances). The outer three planets c (Warm Saturnian), b (Warm Jovian), and e (Cold Neptunian) are in 1:2:4 (30d/60d/120d) resonance (the exoplanet resonance and first triple-resonant planets discovered). The outermost planet has a Mercury-like orbit. Planet b is second discovered by ELODIE after 51 Peg b and the second to have its mass exactly measured and the first to have done so by astrometry.
Epsilon Eridani DuchyEdit
      • Epsilon Eridani System (5.5 ly; 10.5 ly) - Ran (Epsilon Eridani) is the nearest single non-red dwarf star to the Sun, also known as HD 195019, Gl 144, and HR 1084. It is a member of the Ursa Major star association and close encounters to other stars is relatively common. One of the first stars found to have a dust disk, with several potential planets suspected in the gaps early on, and later on of the earliest nearest system with confirmed planets. Has an inner asteroid belt at 3 AU, Jovian planet AEger at 3.4 AU, outer asteroid belt at 20 AU, and Kuiper Belt at 35-100 AU. There is evidence of additional planets between the belts. Because the star is very chromospherically active, doubts were cast on planet's b's existence. Hubble then confirmed its existence with astrometrics and found to be orbiting in the plane of the dust disks, which supported the theory that planets are born from dust disks and yielded a precise mass of 1.5 MJ. The planet b was originally thought to be extremely eccentric (2-10 AU), but later discovery of the inner asteroid belt suggests it is more moderately eccentric so as not to cross the belt. It could still have high eccentricity if the outer belt was being fed with material from the outer belt though. Dinosaur-killing sized impacts would be frequent on any Earth-like planets, about once every 2 million years. One of 5 PICTURE-C targets selected for sub-orbital coronograph observation. One of the first 20 exoplanet systems allowed to be given common names by the IAU. Star is named after a Norse goddess of the seas, while the planet after her husband, god of the ocean. A common sci fi system, including the original home of Star Trek Vulcans (though this moved to 40 Eridani) and Babylon 5.
        • HIP 15689 System (3.9 ly; 14.3 ly) - The closest star to Epsilon Eridani and Keid, in Eridani. A dim red dwarf with an unconfirmed companion star or brown dwarf.
        • Teegarden's Star System (5.8 ly; 12.6 ly) - Teegarden's Star is also called SO 025300.5+165258 or SO 0253+1652 and informally Proxima Arietis. Nearby Red Dwarf star system with flares. It was found in 2003 by inspecting photographs used to discover near earth asteroids, whose motion can spot nearby stars with high proper motion. Only six other stars have a proper motion of more than 5 arcseconds per year.
        • LHS 1565 System (6.9 ly; 11.9 ly) - LHS 1565 is also known as L 372-58m, LTT 1702, GJ 1061 and informally called Proxima Horologii. Nearby Red Dwarf star system. Measurements in 1997 found it was a lot closer than it was once thought to be at 11.9 ly.
Keid DuchyEdit
      • Keid System (10.1 ly; 16.5 ly) - Kied is also known as 40 Eridani, Omicron 2 Eri, and Gl 166. Triple star which is Gene Roddenberry's favored location for Spock's home planet of Vulcan. Consists of an Orange Dwarf primary A (also called HD 26965 and HR 1325) with a flare star Red Dwarf C (also called DY Eridani) orbiting 50 AU away, and a much further White Dwarf B at 600 AU. The white star would appear two orders of magnitude brighter than Venus does from any planets in AC, so it would be visible in the daylight. While no planet has been discovered in this system yet, it has been selected as a target for the SIM Planet quest when launched in 2015 for signs of a habitable planet. The White Dwarf is by far the easiest White Dwarf to observe, as it is brighter than the closer Van Manaan's Star and is not swamped by the light of a bright primary like those found in the Sirius or Procyon systems.
        • 2MASS 0415-0935 System (; 18.7, assumed) - 2MASS J04151954-0935066 is abbreviated as 2MASS 0415-0935. It is a nearby T-Class brown dwarf in Eridani. It was the coolest brown dwarf known when discovered in 2002.
        • LHS 1723 System (5.2 ly; 19.9 ly) - LHS 1723 is also known as LP 656-38 and NN 3323. Variable Red Dwarf star in Eridanus.
        • BD-03°1123 System (6.2 ly; 18.6 ly) - BD-03°1123 System is also called Wolf 1453 and Gl 205, and is located in Orion. With 57% of the Sun's mass, this is one of the larger Red Dwarf stars, sometimes classified as an Orange Dwarf. Mnemonic: BD Orionis.
        • LTT 17897 System (8.4 ly; 17.4 ly) - LTT 17897 is also called G 99-49 and NN 3379 and informally Proxima Orionis (located near Betelgeuse). Red Dwarf flare star. 163,000 years ago, it was 4.3 light years from the Solar System.
        • Giclas 99-44 System (9.23 ly; 20.9 ly) - G 99-44 is also called GJ 223.2, GJ 9193, LP 658-2, LHS 32. It is the 8th closest white dwarf star to the Sun and is in Orion.
        • BD-21°1377 System (9.77 ly; 18.9 ly) - BD-21°1377 is also called L 668-21 and Gl 229 and informally as Proxima Leporus. It is a red dwarf flare star (has one of the highest diameters) with a T6V brown dwarf orbiting it. It has 25 to 65 times Jupiter's and currently about 40 AU from the star. This was the first sub-stellar mass object discovered, in 1994. The star is the current Spectral Standard star for class M1 V.
BD+04°123 DuchyEdit
      • BD+04°123 System (14.5 ly; 24.3 ly) - BD+04°123 is also called HR 222, Gl 33, HD 4628, and 96 G. Piscium. A relatively bright and nearby orange dwarf system visible to the naked eye. Mnemonic: BD Piscium.
        • Lalande 46650 System (7.5 ly; 19.56 ly) - Lalande 46650 is also called Gl 908 and BD+01°4774. Nearby M2 Red Dwarf flare star also called BR Piscis. Currently about 20 light years away, it will become twice as near in 63,000 years.
        • Gliese 1286 System (8.2 ly; 23.5 ly) - GJ 1286 is also known as G 157-77 and LHS 546. Nearby red dwarf star system in Pisces.

Rana Client KingdomEdit

  • Rana System (24.1 ly; 23.1 ly) - Rana is also known as Delta Eridani, HD 23249, HR 1136, and Gl 150. Nearby orange-red sub-giant star system about 30ly away. Has about 2.5 times the Sun's radius. Early estimates thought it could have 87% of the Sun's mass, but newer estimates suggest 1.2 times its mass. It is thought to have evolved from an F8 main sequence star 7.5 Billion Years ago. It will later become a true giant star. Astrometric observations suggest a companion star, but this has not been confirmed with radial velocity, perhaps because its effect would be small due to its inclination to the Sun.
    • Giclas 160-28 System (2.7 ly; 31.0 ly) - G 160-28 is also known as GJ 1065 and LHS 183. Nearby red dwarf system in Eridanus.
    • Luyten 730-18 B System (7.4 ly; 24.8 ly - figure disputed) - Double star in Eridanus. It is not clear if L 730-18 is an actual or just an apparent double star. Some sources list them as the same distance, while others at quite different distances. Star A is also known as LP 771-95, NN 3192 A, and HIP 14101 (?). Star B is also known as LP 771-96 and NN 3193 B. Some sources say they are separated by 48 AU, but it is not clear if this is the distance between A and B or if B itself is a binary with this distance.
BD-13°544 System DuchyEdit
      • BD-13°544 System (10.3 ly; 33.9 ly) - BD-13°544 is also known as Gl 117, HIP 13402, HR 857, and HD 17925. Nearby orange dwarf star system in Eridanus. It is part of the Beta Pictoris moving group. A strong lithium presence indicates that it must be a very young star. Since it is at about 10 parsecs away, its absolute and apparent magnitude are about the same, which is at the very limit of human detection at magnitude 6.04. Mnemonic: BD Eridani.
        • Luyten 730-18 A System (3.1 ly; 35.2 ly - figure disputed) - Double star in Eridanus. It is not clear if L 730-18 is an actual or just an apparent double star. Some sources list them as the same distance, while others at quite different distances. Star A is also known as LP 771-95, NN 3192 A, and HIP 14101 (?). Star B is also known as LP 771-96 and NN 3193 B. Some sources say they are separated by 48 AU, but it is not clear if this is the distance between A and B or if B itself is a binary with this distance.

Kappa Ceti PrincipalityEdit

    • Kappa Ceti System (11.9 ly; 29.9 ly) - Kappa Ceti is also known as Kappa 1 Ceti, HD 20630, HR 996, and Gl 137. Nearby yellow dwarf star system. Kappa 2 Ceti is nearby it in the sky, but is a giant yellow star ten times as far away. Kappa Ceti has similar mass and size as the Sun, but is cooler and less bright. It is much younger than the Sun, at 800 Million Years old. It may emit superflares, which may make life impossible on any otherwise inhabitable worlds. Past spectroscopic studies suggested a partner star, but this has not been confirmed with radial velocity studies.
      • Giclas 77-31 System (2.5 ly; 27.7 ly) - G 77-31 is also known as GJ 1057 and LHS 168, NLTT 10256, and. Nearby red dwarf BY type variable star system known as CD Cetus.
      • Giclas 76-62 System (9.5 ly; 38.7 ly) - G 76-62 is also known as GJ 1055 and LHS 1504. Nearby red dwarf star system.
BD+06°398 DuchyEdit
      • BD+06°398 System (8.3 ly; 28.2 ly) - BD+06°398 is also known as HR 753, HD 16160, and Gl 105. It is a triple star system comprising of an orange dwarf (A) and two red dwarf (B, C). Star A lies at the minimum mass needed for core fusion of Hydrogen. It's habitable zone would be centered at Mercury-like distances. B lies 1,200 AU away, and is a flare star and a BY Draconis variable star also known as BX Ceti. C is an extremely faint Red Dwarf and only about the size of Jupiter and is separated from A by 24 AU, but likely has extreme eccentricity (0.75). It is near the lower mass limit needed to sustain nuclear fusion. Hubble confirmed its existance in 1995. Mnemonic: BD Ceti.
        • LP 469-206 System (5.5 ly; 27.7 ly) - LP 469-206 is also known as NN 3146 and LHS 1376. It is Nearby red dwarf flare star in Aries.
        • LP 469-67 System (6.8 ly; 29.0 ly) - LP 469-67 is also known as NN 3128 and LHS 1326. Nearby red dwarf system in Pisces.

Tabit Client KingdomEdit

  • Tabit System (19.7 ly; 26.1 ly) - Tabit is also known as Pi3 Ori, Gl 178, HD 30652, and, HR 1543,. Nearby Yellow-White Main Sequence star. It is type F6, has about 1.3 times the Sun's mass, and the same amount of its radius. It has a stable spectrum, which is used to compare with other stars. It is the brightest star in Orion's "shield" or "lion". It has a companion star that may be visual or optical. It is now 26.2 ly away, but came within 15 ly 210,000 years ago.
    • Ross 41 System (5.1 ly; 28.4 ly) - Ross 41 is also known as Gl 203 and LHS 1761. It is a nearby red dwarf star system in Orion. It is now 29 ly away and was as close as 13.8 ly 111,000 years ago.
    • BD+18°683 System (7.5 ly; 30.3 ly) - BD+18°683 is also known as Gl 176. It is a nearby red dwarf with a low period neptunian in Taurus. It was likely first catalogued in the Bonn Survey published in 1863 and its high proper motion discovered by Ross. Planet is the fourth discovered Neptunian around a Red Dwarf star. Categorized as a gaseous Hot Superterran with a metals-rich atmosphere. Mnemonic: BD Taurus.
    • Ross 47 System (8.9 ly; 18.9 ly) - Ross 47 is also known as Gl 213 and V1352 Orionis. It is a nearby red dwarf star system located in Orion. Has frequent flares.

BD-05°1123 DuchyEdit

      • BD-05°1123 System (6.6 ly; 28.7 ly) - BD-05°1123 is also known as Gl 183 and HR 1614. It is a nearby orange dwarf star system in Eridanus. It is the title member of the 2 Billion Year Old HR 1614 Moving Group. It is a spectroscopic binary, although no data is available on its companion star. Mnemonic: BD Eridani 2.
        • Luyten 879-14 System (4.3 ly; 31.0 ly) - L 879-14 is also known as NN 3306 and LHS 194. Nearby white dwarf system in Eridanus.

Chi 1 Orionis PrincipalityEdit

    • Chi 1 Orionis System (9.9 ly; 28.3 ly) - Chi 1 Orionis is also called Gl 222, HR 2047, and HD 39587. Nearby binary star system. A yellow dwarf star somewhat brighter than the Sun and a red dwarf. Because the red dwarf orbits 3.3 to 8.9 AU, the chances of a habitable planet are low. A member of the Ursa Major Moving Group. There is a theory that this star may have once been in a star system that includes HD 147513 A and B (which have a planet), which is part of the same moving group. When HD 147513 B went on to become a White Dwarf, material was sluffed off onto Chi 1 Orionis A, enriching it and causing it to become a "Barium Dwarf". Gravitational instabilities caused Chi 1 Orionis and HD 147513 systems to separate.
      • Ross 64 System (3.8 ly; 27.0 ly) - Ross 64 is also known as Gl 232 and LHS 1848. Nearby red dwarf system in Gemini.
      • Riepe's Double System (6.2 ly; 33.6 ly) - Riepe's Double is also known as G 100-28, GJ 1083, and LTT 17846. It is a binary Red Dwarf star which is separated by 62 AU. One of the stars is a flare star known as V780 Tau.
      • BD+17°1320 System (6.6 ly; 32.0 ly) - BD+17°1320 is also known as LHS 1858 and Gl 239. Nearby red dwarf system in Gemini. Mnemonic: BD Gemini.
      • Giclas 99-47 System (7.3 ly; 26.1 ly) - G 99-47 is also known as GJ 1087 and LHS 212. It is a nearby white dwarf system in Orion, about the 10th closest white dwarf. It is a polarized magnetic object.
      • Giclas 109-35 System (7.8 ly; 25.4 ly) - G 109-35 is also known as Gl 1093 and LHS 223. Nearby red dwarf system in Gemini.
BD+11°878 DuchyEdit
      • BD+11°878 System (10.3 ly; 37.1 ly) - BD+11°878 System is also known as Gliese 208, HD 245409, and HIP 26335. Nearby orange dwarf system in Orion. It is on the borderline with being a red dwarf. In 2003, a "cosmic call" was sent to this star and is expected to arrive in 2040. It may have passed within 5 ly 500,000 years ago. Mnemonic: BD Orionis 2.
        • Ross 46 System (4.0 ly; 40.4 ly) - Ross 46 is also known as G097-054, NN 3356, and LTT 11684. Nearby red dwarf system. An x-ray or extreme ultra violet emitting star.
        • Ross 42 System (4.7 ly; 41.7 ly) - Ross 42 is also known as Gl 206, G 97-47, and HIP 25953. Nearby red dwarf system in Orion. It is a spectroscopic binary star.
        • BD+10°1032 System (5.6 ly; 35.2 ly) - BD+10°1032 is also known as Ross 79, Gl 228, G 102-53, HIP 29316, V 236, and LHS 1830. Nearby binary red dwarf system in Orion. Mnemonic: BD Orionis 3.

Gamma Leporis Client KingdomEdit

  • Gamma Leporis System (21.1 ly; 29.3 ly) - Gamma Leporis is also known as Gl 216, HR 1983, and HD 38393. It is a double or triple star system, including a yellow white main sequence star A, a distant orange dwarf companion B at 864 AU. A distant star may or may not be gravitationally bound. This is sometimes called star C, or LTT 2368, or VB 1 (Van Biesbroeck 1). The star system may be 2.7 Billion Years old and is a member of the Sirius group. A has 1.2 times the Sun's mass and 1.3 its diameter. B has 63% of its mass, but about the same diameter. It is a BY Draconis variable star known as AK Leporis. The star is one of the top 100 target stars for the Terrestrial Planet finder mission.
    • BD-21°1051 System (5.0 ly; 27.7 ly) - BD-21°1051 is also known as Gl 185 and LTT 2151. It is a nearby binary red dwarf system in Lepur. The stars are separated by 12 AU. Mnemonic: BD Leporis.
    • Luyten 737-9 System (5.0 ly; 30.3 ly) - L 737-9 is also known as Gl 190 and HIP 23932. Nearby red dwarf system in Lepus.
    • Luyten 736-49 System (5.8 ly; 30.3 ly) - L 736-49 is also known as NN 3325, LHS 1731, and HIP 23512. Nearby red dwarf system in Lepus. Its spectrum is somewhat orangish, K-M3 V.
    • LP 838-16 System (8.6 ly; 37.1 ly) - LP 838-16 is also known as HIP 29052. Nearby red dwarf system in Lepus.
    • CD-44°3045 System (13.0 ly; 24.3 ly - disputed distance) - CD-44°3045 is also known as Gl 257, HIP 33499, and LHS 222. It is a nearby multiple red dwarf system in Puppis. Sometimes listed as about 24 ly away and others as about 38 ly.

BD-05°1844 DuchyEdit

    • BD-05°1844 System (12.1 ly; 28.3 ly) - BD-05°1844 is also known as Gl 250 and HD 50281. Nearby double star consisting of an orange dwarf (A) and a red dwarf (B) in Monoceros. The stars are separated by about 500 light years. Mnemonic: BD Monoceros.
      • Luyten 961-1 System (7.6 ly; 28.7 ly) - L 961-1 is also known as GJ 1103. Nearby binary red dwarf system. Star A is also called LHS 1951, while B is called LHS 1952. They are separated by 26.4 ly.
      • LTT 17993 System (7.8 ly; 20.2 ly) - LTT 17993 is also known as NN 3454 and G 89-32. Nearby binary red dwarf flare star.
      • Luyten 745-46 System (8.6 ly; 29.7 ly) - L 745-46 is also known as Gl 283. Nearby binary system in Puppis consisting of a white dwarf A (also known as LHS 235 and WD 0738-172) and a red dwarf B (also known as LHS 234). A is the brightest white dwarf classified as a DF star.
      • Giclas 113-20 System (11.0 ly; 30 ly) - Giclas 113-20 is also known as GJ 2066 and HIP 40501. Red dwarf in Hydra.
      • Luyten 674-15 System (12.1 ly; 26.6 ly) - L 674-15 is also known as Gl 300 and LHS 1989. Nearby red dwarf variable star.
      • LP 666-9 System (14.7 ly; 28 ly) - LP 666-9 is also known as LHS 2065 and GJ 3517. A red dwarf in Hydra.

Procyon Client KingdomEdit

Has 2 Unconfirmed Planets

  • Procyon System - (5.1 ly; 11.4 ly) Procyon is also known as Alpha Canis Minoris, HD 61421, and HR 2943. Nearby Bright star system. Nearest yellow white star (F5 IV–V) to the Sun and the closest star to Sirius. It is the 7th brightest star in the sky. Has a white dwarf companion B. Has about 50% more mass than the Sun and about twice its radius. It is a BY-Draconis type of variable (unusual for a bright star) and entering the last stage of its life on the main sequence, heading towards a sub-giant, as its core seems to have exhausted its supply of Hydrogen and is starting to fuse Helium. Its habitable zone, which is 2 to 4 AU, may be disrupted by B, which is only 9 to 21 AU away. Star B was first predicted due to its effect on A's proper motion in 1844 and later spotted in 1896. It was probably about the same mass as Star A, and sterilized the system when it went into a giant phase. Luyten's Star is only 1.2 light years away, near enough to stir up any Oort clouds in either system and would be dimly visible.
    • Luyten's Star System (1.2 ly; 12.4 ly) - Nearby Red Dwarf star system also known as BD +05°1668 (sometimes called Luyten 5-1668) and Gl 273. It is in Canis Minor. Named after William Luyten, who with Edwin G. Ebbighausen, first determined its high proper motion in 1935. It is at the maximum mass that a star can be fully convective (ie, the entire star has a single convection zone). It is the closest star to Procyon (1.2 ly), which would appear as -4.5 magnitude star in any of its planets skies.
    • Ross 614 System (4.6 ly; 13.4 ly) - Ross 614 is also called Gl 234. A nearby binary Red Dwarf. Star A is the flare star known as Nearby V577 Monocerotis. First discovered by Ross in 1927 and then Star B was discovered in 1936. Star B has long been considered the quintisential low mass star. Unfortunately its long period of 16.6 years makes it difficult for most studies to observe. They're separated by 2.4 to 5.3 AU.
    • Giclas 51-15 System (5.0 ly 11.7 ly) - DX Cancri is also known as G 051-015, GJ 1111 and informally Proxima Cancri. It is a nearby red dwarf flare star designated. A "spectacular" flare was detected in 2006. A search for a dust disk was undertaken, but none was found. This is thought to be a member of the Castor Moving Group. Its proper motion may first have been noticed by William Luyten.
    • Giclas 41-14 System (5.3 ly; 22.1 ly) - G 41-14 is also known as LHS 6158, and LTT 12352, and NN 3522. It is a is a triple red dwarf system located 22.1 in Hydra, each which is an M4.5 star. A and B are separated only by 0.05 AU. C orbits at 4.5 AU. Older data prior to the resolution of the tightly coupled AB lists it as a single Orange dwarf system.
    • Giclas 9-38 System (8.0 ly; 17.0 ly) - Giclas 9-38 is also known as GJ 1116. It is a binary Red Dwarf separated by 23.5 AU. Star A is a flare star designated EI Cancri. Star B is very tiny and also flares. A SETI signal was detected from this star in 1997.
    • Ross 882 System (8.0 ly; 19.3 ly) - Ross 882 is also known as Gl 285. It is a nearby binary Red Dwarf star. One of the stars is a flare star dubbed YZ Canis Minoris.
    • HIP 33226 System (9.9 ly; 17.9 ly) - Wolf 294 is also known as AC +33°25644, Gl 251, HIP 33226, and informally as Proxima Geminorum. It is a nearby red dwarf star. (note HIP 33226 may be a separate object?)
    • Gliese 251 System (10.8 ly; 18.9 ly) - Wolf 294 is also known as AC +33°25644, Gl 251, HIP 33226, and informally as Proxima Geminorum. It is a nearby red dwarf star. (note HIP 33226 may be a separate object?)
    • Ross 619 System (11.0 ly, 22.1 ly) - Ross 619 is also known as Gl 299. Nearby sub-dwarf red dwarf star in Cancer.
    • LP 731-58 System (11.5 ly; 14.7 ly) - LP 731-58 is also known as LHS 292 and NN 3622 and informally as Proxima Sextantis. Nearby red dwarf star with frequent flares.
Groombridge 1618 Duchy Edit
      • Groombridge 1618 System (12.9 ly; 16.0 ly) - Groombridge 1618 is also known as Gl 380 and HD 88230. Nearby orange dwarf system in Ursa Major. It is an unusually bright flare star, but flares less frequently than other such stars. Its level of activity suggests it is relatively young, perhaps a little older than a Billion years. First identified in A Catalog of Circumpolar Stars by Stephen Groombridge, published posthumously in 1838. An unconfirmed planet was published in 1989 with 4 Jupiter masses at about half Earth's distance, in the inner part of the star's habitability zone. It's signal could be due to stellar activity. Its closest neighbor is a red dwarf UX UMa, which would flicker in and out of visibility due to the effects of its flares.
        • Lalande 21258 System (3.2 ly, 15.6 ly) - Lalande 21258 is also known as Gl 412. It is a nearby binary red dwarf star, sharing a common motion in the sky. The secondary star is a flare star (identified in 1939) also known as WX Ursa Majoris and has been identified as a major source of x-rays. The stars are far enough apart (190 AU) that any planets around star A would be unaffected by the flares from Star B. It would be visible during flare episodes from its nearest neighbor Groombridge 1618. They are members of the Halo population of the galaxy.
        • Lalande 21185 System (8.0 ly, 8.1 ly) - Lalande 21185 is also called GJ 411 and informally Proxima Ursa Majoris. It is the fourth closest star system to the Sun at 8.3 ly. It is the third brightest red dwarf in the night sky. It has been the spectral standard star for class M2 V for a long time. It is sometimes classified as a BY Draconis type variable star and has been known to emit x-rays. Van de Kamp thought he found planets in 1951. The system has two unconfirmed planets detected via radial velocity in 1996. It is also one of the earliest planets detected that still has a good chance to exist. The planets orbit far away from their dim Red Dwarf star, which makes one planet colder than Saturn and the other colder than Neptune despite being at a Saturn-like distance. The star is the nearest Galactic 'Thick Disk' star (which includes about 4% of nearby stars), and moves perpendicular to the galactic plane. It will get nearest to the Sun in 19,000 years when it is 4.65 ly.
        • BD+20°2465 System (8.1 ly, 16.0 ly) - BD+20°2465 is also known as Gl 388. It is a nearby red dwarf flare star also known as AD Leonis and one of the better studied flare stars. It was suspected of having a planet or Brown Dwarf in 1949, but this has not been confirmed.
        • AC+23°468-46 System (10.8 ly, 21.5 ly) - AC+23°468-46 is also known as Gl 408. Nearby red dwarf star in Leo.
        • Wolf 424 System (12.6 ly, 14.1 ly) - Wolf 424 is also known as Gliese 473. Nearby binary Red Dwarf separated by about 2.36 to 4.19 AU with a period of 16.2 years. The secondary star is a flare star known as FL Virginis. At one point, it was thought that these could be high massed Brown Dwarves, but this has been disproven.
        • Wolf 358 System (12.9 ly, 22.5 ly) - Wolf 358 is also known as Gl 402. It is a nearby red dwarf star, possibly with a companion. It is also a flare star called EE Leonis. It is the M4 V spectral standard star.

Altair KingdomEdit

Has no known planets

  • Altair System (*16.7 ly) - Altair is also called Alpha Aquilae, GJ 768, HD 187642, and HR 7557. Second nearest A main sequence class star, on the verge of becoming a sub-giant, and about 1 Billion years old. One of the stars of the Summer Triangle and 12 brightest star in the sky. It is a particularly rapidly spinning (9 hours) and flattened (20%) star. It has 1.7 the Sun's mass and 1.8 its diameter. Its brightness fluxuates slightly, classifying it as a Delta Scuti variable star and given a New Suspected Variable star designation of NSV 24910. In 2006, it became the first star to be directly imaged (in the infrared) other than the Sun. Its equator is darker than its pole due to its rapid rotation, which was visible as a white spot in images. No planets have been detected and there are some theoretical reasons for why a star rotating so quickly might not have planets. It has two visual companions that are not bound to it, but merely close to it in the sky. One of 5 PICTURE-C targets selected for sub-orbital coronograph observation.
    • Wolf 1055 System (3.6 ly; 19.2 ly) - BD+04°4048 is most commonly known as Gliese 752 and also called DM+04°4048. A nearby binary Red Dwarf star system in Aquila and the nearest star to Altair, which appears two order of magnitude than in our sky. Star A is also a flare star known as V1428 Aquilae and is also known as HD 180617. Its high proper motion was first noticed by Max Wolf in 1919, and dubbed Wolf 1055. It was later rediscovered by Frank Ross in 1927 and dubbed Ross 652. It has about half of the Sun's mass and radius and is the M3 V spectral standard star. Star B is also a UV Ceti variable star known as V1298 Aquilae and VB 10 or simply Van Biesbroeck's Star. It shares a proper motion with star A, but is not gravitationally bound with it and lies 434 AU away. VB 10 was the faintest star known when it was discovered in 1944 and is the M8 V spectral standard star. VB 10 contains a controversial "first" exoplanetary system announced in 2009 using astrometry and lies only 20 light years away, but not confirmed with dopplar spectrometry. Would be smallest known star to host a planet and is a flare star. Contain's a cold Jupiter six times Jupiter's mass a Mercury like distance. The "planet" and the star are about the same size and the planet contains 10% of the mass of the system. The star will burn for 10 trillion years, then the planet would fall into it, fuelling it for another 100 billion years. The system is about 1 Billion years old. Mnemonic is BD Aquilae.
    • AC+17°534-105 System (9.8 ly; 21.8 ly) - AC+17°534-105 is most commonly known as Gl 829, but also as R 775, G 126-4. It is a binary red dwarf star system in Pegasus. Star A is also known as LHS 508. Both stars have the same spectral type M3.5.
    • Gliese 791.2 System (12.1 ly; 28.6 ly) - Gl 791.2 is also known as G 144-8, LHS 3556, and HU Delphini. It is a red dwarf flare star with a companion star. Their paralaxes were measured by the Hubble Space Telescope. Their masses are particularly well known, with A being 28% (M6 V) that of the sun and B at 12% of the Sun, and they help define the characteristics of low-mass stars. This helps study brown dwarfs, which are only slightly less massive.
70 Ophiuchi DuchyEdit
    • 70 Ophiuchi System (7.8 ly; 16.6 ly) - 70 Ophiuchi is also known as GJ 702 and HD 165341. It is a nearby pair of orange dwarves, easily visible with the naked eye when away from city lights. Star A is a DY Draconis variable star and is also known as HR 6752. It was first cataloged by William Herschel in the late 18th century during his study of binary stars, who claimed Father Meyor noticed its duplicity earlier (whose other claims could not be verified by contemporaries). He proved the two stars went around each other, an important verification of Newton's laws. He suspected another object was affecting the orbits of the two stars. Other astronomers claimed this could be a planet, such as Captain Jacob in 1855, which is one of the first claims for a planet using astrometric data. See also made a claim in 1899, but Moulton soon published a paper showing that this system would be unstable. In 1943, Reuyl again caused a sensation by claiming planets, only to be refuted again. The two stars follow an eccentric orbit ranging from 11.7 to 34.8 AU away. Star A has about 92% of the Sun's mass. The stars are thought to be 1.5 Billion Years old.
      • BD+24°3192 System (3.2 ly; 10.4 ly - based on inaccurate Hipparcos data) - BD+24°3192 is also known as HIP 85605 and CCDM J17296+2439. Nearby binary star system in Hercules, an Orange Dwarf star with a star of unknown spectral type (HIP 85605). The Hipparcos catalog gives HIP 85605 a nearby distance of 16 ly, which is likely inaccurate, as it doesn't match that of CCDM J17296+2439.
61 Cygni DuchyEdit
    • 61 Cygni System (9.8 ly; 11.41 ly) - 61 Cygni is also called Gl 820, very rarely called Bessel's Star, and informally Proxima Cygni. Nearby star system containing two orange dwarves. This was the star with the highest proper motion known in the 1830s and dubbed as "The Flying Star" by Giuseppe Piazzi in 1792. It is the star with the highest proper motion of any stars visible with the naked eye. In 1911, it was found by Boss to be a part of a moving group, dubbed the 61 Cygni Moving Group. Friedrich Struve first made measurements of it as a binary system in 1830. It was also the first system to have its distance measured by parallax, which was done by Bessel in 1838. The stars are barely visible with the naked eye. The stars are separated on average by 86 AU. The stars atmospheres likely do not touch. The stars are old, 6 to 10 Billion Years old. There were several claims of a planetary system in the 20th Century, but none have panned out. This includes Strand's claim in 1942 (under the direction of Van de Kamp), and Soviet claims in 1977. Heintz proved in 1978 that these claims were false. Due to its proximity to Earth, the star was a tier 1 priority for the Space Interferometry Mission, which hoped to discover planets.
      • Kruger 60 System (5.2 ly; 13.0 ly) - Kruger 60 is also known as BD +56°2783 and Gl 860. It is a nearby pair of Red Dwarfs. B is a flare star known as DO Cephei, which would probably prevent life from developing on any planets. Their distances vary from 5.5 to 13.5 AU. B would appear as a point as bright as the full moon from A. In 88,600 years, it will come closest to the Sun at 6.4 light years, compared to its present distance of 13.1 ly.
      • V1581 Cygni System (5.2 ly; 15.3 ly) - V1581 Cygni is also known as GJ 1245. Nearby triple Red Dwarf star system. Star A is only 11% the Sun's mass and is also known as G 208-44 A and LHS 3494. C is 8 AU (7% Sun's Mass) from A and is also known as G 208-44 B. It is one of the more well known tenuous red dwarfs and is only an M8 in spectral type. B is 33 AU away (10% Sun's Mass) and is also known as G 208-45 and LHS 3495. B would appear as bright as Venus does from A.
      • Ross 248 System (5.5 ly; 10.4 ly) - Ross 248 is also called Gl 905 and informally Proxima Andromedae. Nearby Red Dwarf flare star system dubbed HH Andromedae. There are indications of perterbations caused by an unseen companion, but searches for a brown dwarf star failed to find anything. It will become the nearest star to the sun in 33,000 years. Voyager 1 is heading in the direction of Ross 248 and is expected to be 1.76 light years from it in 40,176 years. It is currently very close to Groombridge 34, which is only 1.8 light years away, and could be visible from that star.
      • Struve 2398 System (6.1 ly; 11.4 ly) - Struve 2398 is also called Sigma 2398, BD+59°1915, DM+59°1915, and Gl 725, and informally Proxima Draconis. It is a nearby binary red dwarf system. The distance of the two component stars was first measured by Friedrich von Struve in 1832. Star A is also known as HD 173739. It is inaccurarely referred to as a K type star in some catalogs. Star B is also known as HD 173740. Their distance ranges from 19 to 65 AU. An observer from Star A would see Star B as a point about as bright as the full moon.
      • Groombridge 34 System (7.1 ly; 11.7 ly) - Groombridge 34 is also known as Gliese 15 and HD 1326. It is a double red dwarf star. Both are flare stars, with A being dubbed GX Andromedae and B GQ Andromedae. The stars are 147 AU apart in nearly circular orbits. Ross 248 is only 1.8 light years away.

Iota Pegasi Client KingdomEdit

  • Iota Pegasi System (26.5 ly; 38.5 ly) - Iota Pegasi is also known as HR 8430, Gl 848, and HD 210027. A nearby Yellow-White Main Sequence Star. Found to have a close orbiting spectrographic companion in the late 19th Century, though it is likely only an optical companion. This is a yellow dwarf star.
    • Gliese 851 System (4.8 ly; 37.2 ly) - Nearby star system also known as Ross 271, AC+17 536-125, LFT 1691, Gl 851, Hip 109555, G 126-61, and V 74.
    • Gliese 836.5 System (5.8 ly; 37.1 ly) - Nearby star system.
    • Gliese 4201 System (5.9 ly; 40.9 ly) - Nearby star system.
    • BD+27°4120 System (6.8 ly; 42.7 ly) - Nearby star system also known as Gl 835, Hip 106811, BD+27 4120, G 188-9, and V 203.
    • Giclas 188-38 System (9.2 ly; 29.34 ly) - G 188-38 is also known as Gl 4247, HIP 108706, and V374 Pegasi. It is a nearby red dwarf star system in Pegasus.
    • HIP 109119 System (10.4 ly; 34.9 ly) - Nearby star system.
    • Gliese 1270 System (13.8 ly; 45.0 ly) - Nearby star system also known as G 215-50, G 215-50, and LHS 524.

Fomalhaut KingdomEdit

13 Known Planets in 8 Systems

  • [1] Fomalhaut System (*25.1 ly) - Fomalhaut is also known as Piscis Austrini, 24 Piscis Austrini, Gl 881, HD 216956, and HR 8728. A triple star, the second brightest star known to have exoplanets. Star A is a white main sequence star about twice the Sun's mass and somewhat less than twice its radius. It was originally thought to be about 200 million years old, but now thought to be 400 MYO, and will turn into a giant in about a billion years. Its dust disk is observed in unprecedented detail. It appears reminiscent of the "Eye of Sauron" from the Lord of the Rings films. A planet suspected of causing a sharp gap in the ring was suspected and imaged, becoming the first visually detected and the first planet since Neptune to be predicted prior to its discovery. The planet, Dagon, orbits about 115 AU and is between Neptune and 3x Jupiter's mass in an eccentric orbit. Planet b was shown to deviate slightly from its predicted path, stirring up some controversy about the planets' existence. The Hubble instrument that detected it is damaged and will not be fixed, making it unobservable for a time. Later analysis of old Hubble data confirmed its existence. Material surrounding the planet has been imaged, rather than the planet itself, which its discoverers admit takes it off the directly imaged list. The planet is hurdling outward from the star in a highly elongated path and will encounter the inner edge of the outer belt in 2032, where icy debris will smash into its atmosphere (unless its orbit is highly inclined). No heat has been detected from the planet, which suggests it is sub-Jovian in mass and could be as small as Pluto, though this could be explained by dissipation from surrounding dust. Evidence for another planet "slicing" through the dust disk was also found, and it may have been responsible for planet b's elliptical orbit. The shape of the ring was put into focus by ALMA, 140 AU out, 16 AU wide, and 1/7th AU thick, placing limits on proposed shepherding exoplanets and showing them to be quite small (a couple times larger than Mars), perhaps why they weren't detected visually. Some proposed inner planets via effects of debris disk could be better interpreted as gas produced effects. The ring is believed to be continuously replenished by cometary collisions occurring every day. An estimated 260 Billion to 83 Trillion comets could exist in it, equivalent to what is in the Sun's Oort Cloud. Star B, an orange dwarf 0.91 ly away has no known disk. Star C, a recently identified Red Dwarf member of the system, located extremely far from the primary (2.5 ly), was also found to have its own disk. Previous interactions may have tilted Star A's disk. The star is a part of the Castor Moving Group. One of the first 20 exoplanet systems allowed to be given common names by the IAU. The planet is named after a half fish Semitic god.
      • CD-23°17699 System (3.5 ly; 26.4 ly) - CD-23°17699 is also known as Gl 884 and HD 217357. Nearby main sequence star in Aquarius sometimes classified as a red dwarf (M0) and others as an orange dwarf (K5).
      • FK Aquarii System (5.5 ly; 28.0 ly) - FK Aquarii is also known as BD-21°6267, Gl 867, and BDS 11854. Nearby binary red dwarf star. A is a variable flare star, while B is an unseen spectroscopic binary companion confirmed in 1965.
      • Luyten 788-34 System (6.3 ly; 24.4 ly) - L 788-34 is also known as LHS 3799 and NN 4274. Nearby red dwarf star in Aquarius.
      • LP 823-4 System (9.3 ly; 29.3 ly) - LP 823-4 is also known as NN 4360 and LHS 4009. Nearby red dwarf flare star in Aquarius.
      • Luyten 499-56 System (10 ly; 32.6 ly) - L 499-56 is also known as NN 4248 and LTT 8811. Nearby red dwarf star in Grus/Piscis Austrinus.
      • LP 701-29 System (10.5 ly; 26.4 ly) - LP 701-29 is also known as GJ 1276. Nearby white dwarf star. It was found to be heavy in helium and a higher amount of metals than most white dwarfs.
TW Piscis Austrini DuchyEdit

0 Known Planets

  • TW Piscis Austrini System (0.73 ly; 24.7 ly) - TW PsA is also known as Gl 879, HR 8721, HD 216803, and CD-32°17321. An orange dwarf flare star and a BY Draconis variable, one of the larger such stars. Less than a light year from Fomalhaut (57,000 AU), and possibly gravitationally bound to it in a cluster or stellar association in the Castor Moving Group. They were found to share a common proper motion and in 2012 it was found to be consistent with a binary syste. About 200 Million Years old, along with the rest of the group. Visible to some humans with the naked eye.
    • HIP 114176 System (3.0 ly; 22.1 ly - does not exist) - Fictitious nearby red dwarf. It does not exist, as the Hipparcos satellite actually only detected scattered light from a nearby star (HIP 114177).
    • Luyten 362-81 System (7.6 ly; 25.4 ly) - L 362-81 is also known as Gl 915 and LHS 1005. Nearby white dwarf in Phoenix. It is possibly the 11th closest white dwarf. Its progenitor was believed to be a 7 solar massed main sequence star, or possibly a 4 solar massed B type star. Its current mass is about 85% of the sun.
    • LP 881-64 System (8.2 ly; 20.9 ly) - LP 881-64 is most commonly known as LHS 1070 and also as GJ 2005. Nearby mid-M red dwarf with two brown dwarf companions in Sculptor. System was first found to be within 10 parsecs in 1986. Brown dwarfs B and C were discovered in 1994 as part of a duplicity survey of nearby red dwarves, but were at first thought to be very low mass red dwarfs. They orbit around each other about once every 16 years, while they go around star A once every 60 to 1000 years. They were thought to be a useful testbed for atmospheres of late main sequence stars, so determining their masses was important. They were confirmed to be early L type brown dwarfs in 2012. Star D was discovered in 1999, but mass for it is undetermined, possibly because of its close separation, but also the star might not actually exist.
    • Luyten 362-29 System (10.1 ly; 20.9 ly) - L 362-29 is also known as GJ 1001 and LHS 102 in Phoenix. Nearby red dwarf with two brown dwarf companions. B found to be a binary brown dwarf in 2003. C may have been the least massive measured L type brown dwarf when measured in 2006.
CD-27°14659 DuchyEdit

2 Known Planets

  • [2] CD-27°14659 System (16.9 ly; 28.7 ly) - CD-27°14659 is most commonly referred to as Gliese 785 and also known as HR 7722 and HD 192310. It is a relatively bright orange dwarf star in Capricorn with planets. It is a chromospherically inactive star with a slow rotation (48 days) and old age of 8 billion years. It is a suspected variable CSV 101960 and NSV 12933 Planet b is a Neptunian with a mildly eccentric orbit near the inner edge of the habitable zone (period is 74 days, distance 0.32 AU). Planet c is somewhat larger and orbiting near the outer edge of the habitable zone at 1.18 AU (528 days).
    • AU Microscopii System (5.8 ly; 32.3 ly) - AU Microscopii is also known as Gl 803, HD 197481, and CD-31°17815. It forms a triple star system with the double red dwarf star AT MiC, located 1.2 ly away, which are also known as Gl 799, HD 196982, and CD-31°16135. An active flare star and about 12 Million Years old. First red dwarf found with a circumstellar disk and the nearest planetforming disk. Also the first system where particle size in disk determined. Constraints on where planets could exist was recently published. Patterns in the dust disks suggest planets. It is thought that Pluto-sized planetoids may have formed in the outer system. AT MiC A and B are separated by 24.2 to 40.8 AU, and are somewhat smaller than AU MiC. All components are part of the Beta Pictoris Moving Group.
    • BB Capricorni System (12.0 ly; 26.1 ly) - BB Capricorni is also known as Gl 831, Wolf 922 A, and LHS 511. Nearby triple red dwarf system. Star A is a variable star. B was discovered in 1987 and was one of the lowest mass stars known at the time. It is observed at 1.74 AU away. C is of unknown spectral type.

Zeta Tucanae Client KingdomEdit

  • Zeta Tucanae System (5.3 ly; 28.0 ly) - Zeta Tuc is also known as HR 77, Gl 17, and HD 1581. Nearby star system. It is a nearby yellowish star with a late F or early G spectrum. It may have an unseen spectroscopic binary partner. It is slightly less massive, slightly larger, and slightly brighter than the Sun and only 44 to 79% its metalicity. It is one of the least variable stars observed during the Hipparcos mission. Its similarity to the Sun make it an interesting target. It is about 3 Billion Years old. It is thought to have a debris disk. Its rotational velocity appears to be almost zero, indicating it presents its pole towards us, which would make finding planets through radial velocity nearly impossible.
        • CD-68°47 System (3.3 ly; 26 ly) - CD-68°47 is also known as Gl 54. Nearby binary red dwarf system. Star A is sometimes given a spectral class K.
p Eridani DuchyEdit
      • p Eridani System (6.3 ly; 26 ly) - p Eridani is also known as Gl 66 and Dunlop 5. Nearby binary orange dwarf star. A is also known as HR 487 and HD 10361, while B is called HR 486 and HD 10360. It was found to be a double in 1825 by Dunlop. It's possible that star B has a spectroscopic companion as suspected in the 1960s.
        • Luyten 363-38 System (10.7 ly; 32.3 ly) - L 363-38 is also known as NN 3049 and LHS 1134. Nearby red dwarf star in Phoenix. A study searching for astrometric sub-stellar companions around nearby single stars was conducted on this system in 2002.
CD-73°1672 DuchyEdit
      • CD-73°1672 System (10 ly; 37 ly)- CD-73°1672 is also known as Gl 902, HD 222237, and LHS 994. Nearby orange dwarf star in Indus.
        • HIP 117828 System (4.1 ly; 33.2 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as CD-76 1182, Hip 117828, HD 223889, CD-76 1182, and CP-76 1619 .
        • Gliese 1277 System (8.5 ly; 36.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as GJ 1277 and LHS 532.
        • Gliese 4154 System (9.7 ly; 41.4 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LHS 3583, L 23-30, and LHS 3583, and LTT 8178.

Deneb Algedi Client KingdomEdit

1 Confirmed Planet

  • Deneb Algedi System (17.6; 38.5 ly) - Deneb Algedi is also known as Delta Capricorni and Gl 837. Nearby yellow-white star, named as the tail of the goat. Classified by some as a yellowish-white giant star, it is more likely a bluish white sub-giant (A3-F2 IV-IIIm). Its exact classification has been made difficult due to light pollution caused by its nearest neighbor. Possibly has three stellar companions.
        • Gliese 843 System (3.9 ly; 40.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as L 715-89, Gl 843, and LHS 3744.
        • Gliese 1265 System (6.2 ly; 33.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as GJ 1265 and LHS 3776.
        • Gliese 821 System (6.8 ly; 39.4 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as Wolf 918, Gl 821, Hip 104432, and LHS 65.
        • Gliese 4281 System (7.3 ly; 35.5 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as LP 760-3, NN 4281, and LHS 523.
        • Gliese 852 System (8.3 ly; 33.3 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star system known as Wolf 1561, and Gl 852. Star A is also known as LHS 3787, while B is known as LHS 3788.
        • Gliese 836 System (9.3 ly; 45.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as L 714-88, Gl 836, and LHS 513.
        • Gliese 810 System (9.4 ly; 41.4 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star system known as L 856-54, Gl 810. Star A is also known as LHS 501.
        • Gliese 1263 System (11 ly; 39.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as Wolf 940, GJ 1263, G 26-30, and LHS 3708. Contains a brown dwarf star.
        • BD+00°4810 System (12.3 ly; 33.6 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system in Aquarius known as BD+00 4810, Gl 846, Hip 10872, HD 209290, and LHS 3745 .
        • [1] BD-05°5715 System (12.3 ly; 28.7 ly) - BD-05°5715 is best known as Gliese 849 and also known as LHS 517. Nearby red dwarf star system in Aquarius with a planet. Contains the first long period exoplanet found around a red dwarf star using dopplar spectrometry. Also only the second Jupiter mass planet around a star less massive than half the Sun. Also the first confirmed Jupiter-sized planet at Neptune-like temperatures. There is evidense for a second planet.
CD-30°19255 DuchyEdit
      • CD-30°19255 System (14.4 ly; 44.0 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Piscis Austrinus known as CD-30 19255, Gl 868, Hip 111960, HD 214749, and C-30 19255.
        • Gliese 4288 System (1.8 ly; 46.0 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star system known as L 645-74 and NN 4288. Star A is also known as LTT 9123 and LP 932-12, while Star B is LTT 9124 and LP 932-13 and NN 4289 B.
        • Gliese 4350 System (10.6 ly; 40.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system known as L 504-27, NN 4350, LFT 1809, LTT 9624, LP 986-92, and LHS 547.

Beta Hydri Client KingdomEdit

    • Beta Hydri System (17.7 ly; 24.4 ly) - Beta Hyi is also known as HR 98, Gl 19, and HD 2151. The nearest confirmed subgiant star to the Sun. It is a yellowish subgiant (G2 IV) evolved from a low F class main sequence star.

Delta Pavonis PrincipalityEdit

3 Known Planets around 2 Planetary Systems; 3 Unconfirmed Planets

    • Delta Pavonis System (9.3 ly; 19.9 ly)- Delta Pavonis is also known as Gl 780, HD 190248, and HR 7665. One of the nearest bright stars to the sun. Although somewhat smaller than the Sun, it is easily visible with the naked eye. It is about 6.8 Billion Years old. It has a New Suspected Variable designation NSV 12790 and appears unusually bright for a main sequence star, so may be starting to become a sub-giant. It was identified as the best SETI target of the nearest 100 G-type stars. It is the nearest solar-analog in a single system and is type G5-8 V-IV.
      • Luyten 119-44 System (5.9 ly; 22.2 ly) - L 119-44 is also known as NN 4285 and LTT 91087. Nearby red dwarf star of unknown spectral type and nearest star to Delta Pavonis.
      • Luyten 205-128 System (6.2 ly; 18.9 ly) - L 205-128 is also known as Gl 693. Nearby red dwarf in Pavo. It is a variable star also known as NSV 9629 and CSV 102836.
      • HIP 82725 System (7.6 ly; 15.9 ly; likely error) - HIP 82725 and HIP 82724 were thought to be a nearby binary system in Ara. Some sources indicate these are two red dwarfs. Others suggest this HIP 82725 is an orange subgiant star and HIP 82724 is a dwarf star and that the parallax measurement of Hipparcos is wrong.
Epsilon Indi DuchyEdit

0 Known Planets

      • Epsilon Indi System (9.3 ly; 11.7 ly) - Epsilon Indi is the also known as HR 8387, Gl 845, and HD 209100. Second nearest single sunlike star to the Sun. Orange dwarf with a binary brown dwarf orbiting it. The smaller of the two is the closest thing to an "extrasolar moon" found so far. The constellation "Indus" first appeared in 1603 in the Uranometria. Epsilon Indi appeared as one of the Indian's arrows in Bode's 1801 atlas, the Uranographia. The star's high proper motion was first discovered by Gill in 1882, which was improved upon by Shapley in 1923. During 1960, the star was observed for radio signals, but none was found. In 1972, it was searched for ultraviolet laser signals. It leads a Carnegie list of stars most likely to have an earth-like planet. The star's age has been controversial, at first thought to be older than the sun, then younger, then even older than originally thought, all based on studies regarding the brown dwarf's nature and the rotation rate of the star.
        • Lacaille 8760 System (4.4 ly; 12.7 ly) - Lacaille 8760 is also known as Gl 825 and informally Proxima Microscopii. Considered the brightest red dwarf in the sky, though it is sometimes listed with a K spectral type. It is just barely possible for someone with exceptionally good eyesight to see under the ideal conditions. Its orbit is rather tilted and eccentric. Its high proper motion was first noticed by Carl Moestra in 1875. It is a variable star known as AX Microscopii, but does not have devastating flares which would disrupt life. The habitable zone would be from 0.27 to 0.53 AU.
        • Lacaille 9352 System (4.7 ly; 10.8 ly) - Lacaille 9352 is also called Gl 887 and HD 217987 and informally Proxima Piscis Austrini. Nearby red dwarf star with about half the sun's mass and radius. It is the second bright red dwarf in the sky, but is too dim to see unaided. Its high proper motion was discovered by Gould.
        • CD-49°13515 System (4.8 ly; 16.0 ly) - CD-49°13515 is most commonly known as Gl 832, and also L 354-89, DM-49°13515, and HD 204961. It is the third nearest red dwarf with planets and in the constellation Indus. It can be considered a miniature version of the Solar System, with a large gaseous planet in a far orbit, and a smaller potentially rocky planet interior. Has a slightly eccentric Jovian planet with 64% Jupiter's mass at an asteroid-belt like distance. The planet has the second largest angular separation from it star of any known planets and is further from its star than any other red dwarf orbiting planet. A good astrometry detection candidate and a target for SIM. One of the larger red dwarf planets around one of the larger (M1.5) red dwarves (about half a Solar Mass). It also emits x-rays. Super Earth planet c is the most Earth-like known exoplanet, and one of the top three potentially habitable planets, but is more likely a super Venus. A third Earth-sized planet could exist between these planets.
        • Cincinnati System (6.7 ly; 14.0 ly) - Cincinnati is also known as HD 225213 and CD-37°15492. It is a red dwarf in Sculptor. It is a BY Draconis variable with the designation NSV 15017. Because it lies very close to the origin of the right ascension of the 1950 Epoch and thus became ordered as number 1 in both the Gliese Catalog of Nearby Stars (Gl 1) and the Luyten Half Second catalog (LHS 1). It is considered a "runaway star" and may be associated with the Tucana-Horologium and/or the AB Doradus stellar associations.
        • EZ Aquarii System (8.4 ly; 11.1 ly) - EZ Aquarii is also called Gl 866, L 789-6, and informally Proxima Aquarii. Nearby triple red dwarf star system, all near the lower limit of hydrogen burning of 75 Jupiters. All three put together is about a third of the Sun's mass. A (M5Ve) is only 11% as massive as the sun and 15% its diameter. Its high proper motion was first discovered by Luyten. A and B are in an eccentric orbit separated by 1.2 AU on average. A also has a spectroscopic binary companion C which has a period of only 3.8 days. C is so small that it's possible that it's a brown dwarf, though probably not. The stars are close enough to interfere with each other's habitable zones. It's possible a habitable planet exists around B, but flares would make this difficult.
J. Herschel 5173 DuchyEdit

0 Known Planets

      • J. Herschel 5173 System (10.4 ly; 19.9 ly) - J. Herschel 5173 is also known as Gl 783, HD 191408, HR 7703, CD-36°13940, DM-36°13940, and 279 G. Sagittarii. Nearby orange dwarf star with a red dwarf companion, currently separated by 43 AU. Herschel first published it as a binary star. It is heading towards the Sun and will be 6.7 ly away (compared to its current 19.9 ly) in 40,000 and will be 10 times as bright. It could be a member of the Old Disk, which implies an age of up to 10 Billion Years old, though rotational analysis suggests 6.4 to 7.7 BY. It is a tier 1 priority for searching for planetary companions by SIM. Has two optical companions which are not optically bound, which are themselves binaries, Gl 783.1 AB Gl 738.2 AB.
        • CD-45°13677 System (3.4 ly; 20.2 ly) - CD-45°13677 is also known as Gl 784 and HD 191849. Nearby red dwarf star system in Telescopium.
        • Luyten 347-14 System (4.7 ly; 18.5 ly) - L 347-14 is also known as Gl 754 and LHS 60. Nearby red dwarf star system in Corona Australis. It was found to be a solar neighbor by a RECON team in 2004. It was confirmed not to be a sub-dwarf star in 2005.
        • LP 816-60 System (7.2 ly; 17.9 ly) - LP 816-60 is also known as HIP 103039, NLTT 50038, LP 816-060, and Gliese X2. Nearby red dwarf (M1) star system in Capricorn. It was the nearest star newly found to be nearby by Hipparcos in 1996 (17.9 ly, whereas all other newly identified stars were beyone 10 parsecs).
        • HIP 93449 System (8.9 ly; 26.7 ly - parallax error) - R Coronae Australis is also known as HIP 93449. It is a white giant star system surrounded by dust. Hipparcos inaccurately placed it at about 30 light years away, while Earth based parallaxes suggest a more likely 500 light years.
MLO 4 DuchyEdit

2 Known Planets, 3 Unconfirmed Planets; 1 Known Planetary System

      • [2+] MLO 4 System (14.8 ly, 22.8 ly) - MLO 4 is most commonly known as Gliese 667 and also known as HR 6426 and HD 156384. A triple star system 23 light years away that contains planets in Scorpius. It was first cataloged as a binary star by astronomers at the old Melbourne Observatory (MLO) in Australia in 1867, so it was cataloged as MLO 4. It consisting of binary of orange dwarf stars about 12 AU apart (ranging from 5 to 20 AU), around which a distant red Dwarf C orbits (ranging from 56 to 215 AU). Star C is a dynamically packed planetary system, with at up to 7 unconfirmed super-Earth planets. The system became the nearest multistar system with planets when planet b (innermost, largest), a temperate super Earth planet (5.7 ME, 0.05 AU) was discovered, and is at the very inner edge of the most generous habitable zone. It became the poster child for an announcement of 32 exoplanets discovered by European astronomers working on the HARPs project and brought the total number of exoplanets to near 400. Planet c was later discovered near the inner edge of least generous habitable zone and is about the same size, and receives the same amount of stellar energy as the Earth. It was calculated that it likely no longer has a magnetic field that could protect its oceans from stellar radiation. Planets f and e were confirmed and also orbit in the Hz further out. Planet d is just beyond he HZ. Outermost planet, g (2.4 ME) is likely a frozen planet and the only one beyond Mercury-like distances. The multi-planet solution is somewhat lax and complicated and may need further confirmation. An even more unconfirmed planet h may be between b and c. A fourth stellar companion D is not gravitationally bound to the system.
        • CD-37°10765 System (7.0 ly, 27.7 ly) - CD-37°10765 is also known as Gl 618 and HIP 80018. Nearby binary red dwarf star in Scorpius, separated by 48 AU. Both stars are possibly sub-dwarf stars (A is M2-4 V-VI, B is M5.5 V-VI).
36 Ophiuchi DuchyEdit

1 Known Planet

      • 36 Ophiuchi System (15.8 ly; 19.6 ly) - 36 Ophiuchi is also known as Gl 663. A nearby triple orange dwarf star system. Stars A and B have extremely eccentric orbits and their distance varies from 7 to 169 AU and are bright K0/K1 stars. Star A is also called HR 6402 and 155886, while Star B is also called HR 6401 and HD 155885. Limits have been placed on planets in this system and orbits beyond 1.5 AU may not be possible. Gliese Star C lies 5,000 AU away and is a dimmer star. It is also known as Gl 663C and Gl 664 and HD 156026. It is a RS CVn type variable star designated V2215 Oph. The system is relatively young at 1 to 1.8 Billion Years old and A is sometimes listed as a pre-main sequence star.
        • CD-32°13297 System (3.1 ly; 20.2 ly) - CD-32°13297 is also known as GJ 2130. Nearby triple red dwarf system in Scorpius. Star A is also known as HIP 86961. Star B is also known as HIP 86963 and CD-32°13298. A third star of unknown spectral type also exists. Some sources list its distance as 20.1 ly, while others 46.2 ly.
        • CD-44°11909 System (6.3 ly; 16.3 ly) - CD-44°11909 is also known as Gl 682 and DM-44°11909. Nearby red dwarf system in Scorpius, possibly a sub-dwarf (spectrum M3.5-4.5 V-IV).
        • BD-08°4352 System (6.3 ly; 18.6 ly) - BD-08°4352 is also known as Wolf 630, Gl 644, and HD 152751. It is a nearby triple or quadruple (once thought to be quintuple, and the nearest one) red dwarf system in Ophiuchus, consisting of Gl 644 A, Bb, Bc, C. It is also known as Gl 644. All stars are red dwarfs, but combined exceed the Sun's mass. Stars A and B (Ba/Bb) are separated by about 1.3 AU, which for 50 years was the closest any stars have been visually resolved since its duplicity was found in 1934. These three stars are probably coplanar. Star A is the flare star known as V1054 Ophiuchi. Star B is a close unresolved spectroscopic binary, with Ba and Bb being separated only by 0.04 AU (but it might just be a single star). Star C orbits at 1420 AU away, though stability analysis suggests it must be at least 2840 AU. It is flare star and also known as VB 8 and is the smallest and faintest member. VB 8 is the M7 V spectral standard star. In 1984, there were claims that the first exoplanet orbited this star, and later claims of a Brown Dwarf, but these have been refuted. It was once thought that Wolf 629 was gravitationally bound to this system, which was also dubbed planet D. Parallax measurements showed that it has to be at least 1 ly from the system though. The star is the first star in the proposed Wolf 630 moving group.
        • BD-12°4523 System (7.4 ly; 14.0 ly) - BD-12°4523 is also known as Wolf 1061 and Gl 628. Nearby red dwarf flare star also called V2306 Ophiuchi. It is possibly a binary star. Has three super Earths, at 0.03 (1.4ME+), 0.08(4.3ME+), and 0.2 AU (5.2 ME+). Had the nearest potentially habitable planet, about 4 Earth masses.
        • [1] CD-46°11540 System (7.4 ly; 14.7 ly) - CD-46°11540 is most commonly known as Gliese 674 and informally Proxima Arae. It is the nearest red dwarf known to have a planet and was the second nearest known exoplanet to the Sun when discovered. The star is type M3 V and is about 35% as massive and 42% as wide as the Sun and believed to be 550 million years old. It was once classed as an orange dwarf and a possible sub-dwarf. It was discovered by John Tome at Cordoba in Argentina. The planet is a Hot Neptunian in a tight orbit that has a similar eccentricity as Mercury. It's about 70% the mass of Neptune and 12 times that of Earth. It is unclear what its nature would be. It orbits at 0.04 AU, which is closer than the habitable zone, which is 0.13 to 0.15 AU.
        • Gliese 1224 System (8.1 ly; 24.5 ly) - G 154-44 is also known as GJ 1224 and LHS 3359. Nearby red dwarf flare star in Serpens Cauda.

82 Eridani PrincipalityEdit

Has 3 Known Planets

    • [3] 82 Eridani System (15.2 ly, 19.7ly) - 82 G. Eridani is also known as 82 Eri, HR 1008, Gl 139, and HD 20794. One of the nearest star systems with planets. It is one of the dimmer yellow dwarf stars. Has three radial velocity detected super Earth planets orbiting closer than the habitable zone. The outermost one d is the largest (5 times Earth's mass, twice its radius, rocky-water composition) is about the same distance as Mercury is from the Sun. The middle one c is 0.1 au closer and is the smallest (2.5 Earth's mass, 1.5 its radius) and is likely a rocky-iron in composition. The innermost one is at 0.1 AU and just slightly larger than c, but more massive and of a more rocky-water composition. A dust disk was also found about 20AU from the star. The 2007 book "Habitable Planets for Man", released prior to the discovery of the planetary system, placed this as the most habitable star system within reach of mankind.
      • LP 944-20 System (4.4 ly, 16.2 ly) - LP 944-20 is also known as BRI 0337-3535 and 2MASS J03393521-3525440. Brown Dwarf star with spectral class T3V originally thought to be a dim M9 Red Dwarf when detected by the Luyten Palomar survey in the 1975. It was not observed again until it was rediscovered in 1990. It was found to be a Brown Dwarf in 1998. It was unexpectedly found to flare in 1999, which was thought impossible for a Brown Dwarf. Changes in surface chemistry suggest weather patterns similar to Jupiter, including high lithium content and clouds. It appears to be a member of the Castor moving group.
      • DENIS 0255-4700 System (; 16 ly; assumed) - DENIS 0255-4700, first identified as an object of interest in 1999, was found to be the nearest class L Brown Dwarf, the faintest type of brown dwarf, to the Solar System in 2006. It was the faintest object beyond the solar system to have its intrinsic brightness measured. In Eridanus.
      • Luyten 302-89 System (8.2 ly; 19.9 ly) - L 302-89 is also known as GJ 2034. It is a white dwarf star.

Gamma Pavonis Client KingdomEdit

0 Known Planets

  • Gamma Pavonis System (18.6 ly; 30.1 ly) - Gamma Pavonis is also known as Gl 827, HD 203608, and HR 8181. Nearby yellow-white star system. It has 21% greater mass and 15% greater radius than the Sun. It is the Terrestrial Planet Finder's 14th top priority for the search of habitable planets. Its orbit has an unusual peculariar velocity with respect to neighboring stars and is likely an old disk star.

CD-54°9222 PrincipalityEdit

0 Known Planets

    • CD-54°9222 System (16.3 ly; 44.3 ly) - CD-54°9222 is also known as Gl 853, HR 8501, and HD 211415. Nearby yellow dwarf star with a red dwarf companion in Grus. A and B are separated by about 45 AU. It was identified in 2003 by astrobiologist Margaret Turnbull as one of the most promising candidates for hosting life and a top five candidate for a solar-type star old enough to host a radio-emitting civilization that could be detected by SETI.
Gliese 1267 DuchyEdit

0 Known Planets

      • Gliese 1267 System (1.0 ly; 43.6 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Grus known as CD-55°9073, GJ 1267, Hip 110443, HD 211970, LTT 8985.
        • Gliese 842 System (6.6 ly; 38.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as CP-60 7528, L 165-2, Sm 96, Gl 842, Hip 108569, CD-60 7821, and LHS 3741.
        • Wo 9780 System (6.7 ly; 38.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LTT 9012, LFT 1714, Wo 9780, and LHS 3804.
Gliese 798 DuchyEdit

0 Known Planets

      • Gliese 798 System (11.5 ly; 39.4 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Indus known as CD-53°8617, Gl 798, Hip 102186, HD 196877, and LHS 496.
Gliese 1279 DuchyEdit

0 Known Planets

      • Gliese 1279 System (13.5 ly; 49.2 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Indus known as CD-68°2331, GJ 1279, Hip 114361, HD 218511, and CP-68 3561.

Gliese 2020 Client Kingdom (likely error) Edit

  • Gliese 2020 System (20.0; 38.5) - Nearby yellow-white star known as Gl 2020, HD 6088, and HIP 4819. Its proximity is probably an error since its absolute magnitude is calculated at 9.4, yet its class is F0 V.

Psi Capricorni Client KingdomEdit

No Known Planets

  • Psi Capricorni System (28.6 ly; 47.9 ly) - Nearby yellow-white star known as Psi Capricorni, HR 7936, and Gl 805.
        • Gliese 791 System (4.8 ly; 50.2 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as CD-28 16676, Gl 791, LHS 3553, Hip 100923, CD-28 16676, and LHS 3553.
      • Gliese 796 System (1.7 ly; 47.6 ly) - Nearby yellow-orange dwarf (G8-K0 V) in Capricorn known as HR 7898,Gl 796, HD 196761, and CD-24 16193.
      • BD-20°5833 System (8.8 ly; 51.2 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Capricornus known as BD-20 5833, Gl 782, Hip 99385, HD 191391, and LHS 3526. Possibly has a stellar companion.
        • Gliese 781.3 System (4.5 ly; 55.1 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as L 565-62, LP 926-52, LTT 7954, Wo 9686 A, Gl 781.1 A, Hip 99150, and LHS 3524.
      • Gliese 770 System (9.7 ly; 46.3 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star known as CD-24 15668, HR 7578, Gl 770 A, Hip 97944, HD 188088. Possibly has a companion star.
        • Gliese 781.1 System (6.8 ly; 47.6 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as L 565-62, LP 926-52, LTT 7954, Wo 9686, Gl 781.1, Hip 99150, and LHS 3524.
        • Gliese 2147 System (7 ly; 50.2 ly) - Nearby white dwarf star in Sagitarius known as GJ 2147 and HIP 99438.

Iota Piscium Client KingdomEdit

1 Known Planet

  • Iota Piscium System (29.2 ly; 45.0 ly) - Nearby yellow-white star with a stellar companion known as Iota Piscium, HR 8969, and Gl 904.
        • Gliese 895.2 System (2.5 ly; 45 ly) - Nearby white dwarf star known as Gl 895.2, ZZ Piscis, LHS 5405, and LTT 16907. Has a possible (very early discovered) brown dwarf companion.
        • Gliese 4368 System (4.4 ly; 42.4 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LTT 17025, NN 4368, G 29-73, and LHS 4022. Involved in a study.
        • Gliese 899 System (4.6 ly; 45.6 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Wolf 1039, Gl 899, Hip 116317(?), G 29-43, and LHS 545.
        • Gliese 16 System (11.8 ly; 52.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as AC+09 2-34, Gl 16, Hip 1463, and V 356.
        • Gliese 1014 System (13.4 ly; 50.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as GJ 1014 and LHS 117.
        • Gliese 1007 System (15.2 ly; 57.7 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LTT 10099, GJ 1007, G 31-39, and LHS 1052.
      • BD-07°5871 System (14 ly; 45.6 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Aquarius known as BD-07 5871, Gl 875, Hip 112774, and HD 216133.
        • Gliese 4239 System (11.4 ly; 43.4 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LP 639-1, NN 4239, LHS 516, and LP 639-1.
        • Gliese 897 System (11.4 ly; 42.1 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star with bad Hipparcos data. Known as BD-17 6768, Gl 897, Hip 116191, and G 273-67. Second star known as GGl 898. Separated by 4340 AU.

85 Pegasi PrincipalityEdit

1 Known Planet

    • 85 Pegasi System (16.8 ly; 40.4 ly) - Nearby triple star system with a yellow dwarf A, orange dwarf B, and red dwarf C. Known as 85 Peg, HR 9088 and Gl 914.
        • Gliese 1288 System (3.9 ly; 39.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 130-3 and GJ 1288.
        • Gliese 3028 System (5.2 ly; 40.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LP 292-67, NN 3028, and LHS 112.
        • Gliese 26 System (6.4 ly; 41.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Wolf 1056, AC+31 719, Gl 26, G 69-10, and LHS 119.
        • Gliese 4333 System (10.4 ly; 34.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 4333 and HIP 115332.
      • Gliese 5 System (4.6 ly; 44.7 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star known in Pegasus as BD+28 4704, HR 8, Gl 5, Hip 544, and HD 166.
        • Gliese 1292 System (4.9 ly; 45.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star in Pegasus known as G 129-47, GJ 1292, and LHS 551.
        • Gliese 3061 System (8.6 ly; 46 ly) - Nearby variable red dwarf (possibly double or triple) star known as FT Psc, NN 3060, LP 350-019, and NLTT 02804, GJ 3061, LP 350-020, NLTT 02805, HIP 3937, and LTT 10301.
        • Gliese 1006 System (9.5 ly; 49.9 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as L 1226-9 and GJ 1006. Star A is also known as LP 404-61, L 1226-9, Hip 1295, G 32-6, and LHS 107. Star B is also known as LP 404-62, L 1226-8, G 32-7, and LHS 108.
        • Gliese 1011 System (10.2 ly; 53.5 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star in Andromedae known as G 130-66, GJ 1011, and G 131-62 USNO 2.
        • Gliese 905.2 System (10.9 ly; 54.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as AC+32 86422, AC+32 86422, LTT 16990, Wo 9838 A, Gl 905.2 A, Hip 117059, and G 130-6.
      • [1] 54 Piscium System (7.9 ly; 36.2 ly) - 54 Piscium is a nearby orange dwarf star also known as HR 166, Gl 27, Hip 3093, HD 3651. Has an eccentric planet about the mass of Saturn orbiting at Mercury-like distances. A recently discovered faint distant T type brown dwarf 476 AU away was found to be the cause of this eccentricity, which was directly imaged.
        • Gliese 3060 System (4 ly; 39.1 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as LTT 10301, LP 350-20, and NN 3060. Separated by about 14 AU.
        • Gliese 3010 System (4.8 ly; 34.6 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 131-26, NN 3010, and LTT 10045.
        • Gliese 12 System (6.5 ly; 37.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as L 1154-29, Gl 12, LP 462-42, G 30-55, and LHS 1050.
        • Gliese 1029 System (7.6 ly; 41.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 69-47, GJ 1029, G 69-47, and LHS 135.
        • Gliese 3039 System (9.1 ly; 37.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as LP 525-39 and NN 3039.
        • Gliese 3052 System (9.2 ly; 40.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 3052, G01-18, LTT 10257, and LHS 1137.

Xi Pegasi Client KingdomEdit

1 Known Planet

  • Xi Pegasi System (38.1 ly; 52.8 ly) - Nearby yellow-white dwarf star known as Xi Pegasi and HR 8665. Has a red dwarf companion.
        • Gliese 1269 System (4.1 ly; 52.5 ly) - Nearby orange sub-giant star, possibly with an error in the Hipparcos data (actually 216 ly away). Also known as Lalande 43867. Has a stellar companion of unknown spectral type.
        • Gliese 4279 System (9.7 ly; 45.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 4279, G 18-49, LTT 16577, L 1149-75, LP 580-17, and Rob 320.
        • Wo 9773 System (10.6 ly; 45.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Wolf 1014, CC 1346, LTT 16502, LFT 1693, Wo 9773, Hip 109638, G 18-36, and LHS 3773.
        • BD+08°4887 System (11.7 ly; 41.7 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as BD+08 4887, LFT 1723, Gl 863, Hip 111313, BD+08 4887, G 18-56, LHS 3828, and V 208.
      • Gliese 4319 System (8.3 ly; 51.8 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf or red dwarf star known as G 29-18, G 28-50, NN 4319, and LTT 16837. Some sources give 51.8 ly, while others 70.3 ly.
        • Gliese 889.1 System (3.5 ly; 51.2 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Gl 889.1, AC+03 2781-116, LTT 16795, Wo 9810, Hip 114233, G 28-39, LHS 3899, and V 343.
        • Gliese 4383 System (10.6 ly; 55.7 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 4383, G 30-33, LTT 17066, Wolf 1051, USNO 785, Hip 18200, and CC1465.
        • Gliese 4370 System (12.2 ly; 60.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 4370, G 30-26, and LTT 17035.
    • [1] 51 Pegasi System (8.4 ly; 50.2 ly) - The star called 51 Pegasus is now known as Helvetios. Contains the first exo-planet around a normal star discovered and the first "Hot Jupiter" found, which is nicknamed "Bellerophon", and now called Dimidium. Star is about 50 ly located in the square of Pegasus, a G5 star somewhat larger and more massive than the Sun. The planet's discovery was incompatible with planetary system formation models, so they were tweaked to allow for planetary migration. It was also initially thought to be an anomaly or the stripped down core of a brown dwarf. Found to have supersonic winds that caused the eternal night-side hemisphere to be as hot as the day-side one. During its 20th anniversary, this planet became the first one's whose reflected visible light was detected. The technique involved looking at a star's visible spectrum, and then detecting a faint reflection of this spectra. Its actual mass (0.46 MJ) and inclination (9deg) were obtained as a result. The planet seems to have a larger radius and bright surface, rather typical for hot jupiters. One of the first 20 exoplanet systems allowed to be given common names by the IAU. The star's name is Latin for a Celtic tribe that lived in Switzerland (the place where its planet was discovered) during the middle ages. The planet's name is Latin for "half" due to the fact its minimum mass is half as massive as Jupiter's.
        • Gliese 4306 System (2.5 ly; 50.2 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Steph 2065 and NN 4306.
        • Gliese 4292 System (3.8 ly; 51.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 127-50 and NN 4292.
        • Gliese 4326 System (9 ly; 41.7 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 67-53, NN 4326, LTT 16843, L 1295-9, and LP 462-19.
        • Gliese 875.1 System (10.3 ly; 46.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star system also known as AC+31 70565, LFT 1741, G 128-08, and LHS 3861.
        • Gliese 856 System (12.8 ly; 52.5 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as AC+31 68884, Gl 856, Hip 110526, G 189-16, and V 840.
        • Gliese 4380 System (16.3 ly; 59.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 129-48, LHS 5411, and NN 4380.
    • HIP 117042 System (17 ly; 60.6 ly - bad parallax) - Nearby yellow dwarf with a bad Hipparcos parallax. Known as BD+18 5200, Hip 117042, and HD 222788.

Vega KingdomEdit

1 Known Planet

  • Vega System (; 25.4 ly) - Vega is also known as Alpha Lyrae, HR 7001, HD 172167, and Gl 721. It is the fifth brightest star in the night sky the second brightest star visible from the Northern hemisphere, and brightest star in the Northern Summer. It is part of the Summer Triangle. It was the first star to be photographed in 1850. It is a slightly bluish star (A0) with about 2.15 times the sun's mass and 2.7 its diameter. It was at first estimated to be about 200 Million Years old, but now thought to be closer to 700. It was found to be rotating so fast that the equator bulges significantly (23%) and is cooler at its poles. Nearby star with one of the first detected circumstellar disks. The star is pointed nearly pole-on from the Earth, so it is ideal for the observation of dust disks. There have been many studies suggesting planets are responsible for features found in the disk. Two bright "clumps" of dust were identified and thought to be due to the gravitational effects of an eccentric planet's orbit. It was surmised that this disk was caused by a collision between Pluto sized objects. A distinct asteroid belt and kuiper belt at distance scales that dwarf our Solar Systems was found to exist, which suggest outer planets clearing out the space in between. These planets cannot be detected at the present, but could be detected by the James Webb Space Telescope. One of 5 PICTURE-C targets selected for sub-orbital coronograph observation.
        • LP 229-17 System (1.2 ly; 26.4 ly) - LP 229-17 is also called NN 4063. Nearby red dwarf star.
        • Luyten 1499-28 System (4.2 ly; 26.7 ly) - L 1499-28 is also known as LHS 471, LP 336-6, AC +32 54804-0, and Gl 747. Nearby red dwarf star.
        • Giclas 184-19 System (6.3 ly; 24.1 ly) - G 184-19 is also known as GJ 1230. Nearby triple red dwarf star in Hercules. Star A is a flare star and also known as LHS 3405. Star B is also known as LP 319-2 and LHS 3404. Star B is underluminous for its spectral type, about 13 times fainter than Star A, despite both being M4.5 V stars.
        • Giclas 203-47 System (7.3 ly; 23.8 ly) - G 203-47 is also known as NN 3991, HIP 83945, and USNO 752. Nearby spectroscopic binary red dwarf in the Ursa Major Moving Group.
        • BD+45°2505 System (8.4 ly; 20.5 ly) - BD+45°2505 is also known as Fur46, HD 155876, Gl 661, and informally known as Proxima Hecrulis (there are nearer brown dwarves in the constellation though). Nearby binary red dwarf system in Hercules separated by 4.49 AU on a highly eccentric (0.73) orbit. Star A is also known as LHS 433, while Star B is also known as LHS 434. Gerard Kuiper first discovered the star was binary in 1934, giving the system the name Kui79.
        • Ross 731 System (9.3 ly; 28 ly) - Ross 731 is also known as Gl 745. Nearby binary red dwarf star in Sagittarius. Both stars are possibly sub-dwarfs. Star A is also known as LHS 3433, while B is also known as LHS 3432. They are separated by 948 AU.
        • Giclas 185-18 System (12.9 ly; 33.3 ly) - G 185-18 is also known as GJ 1235, LHS 476, and YPC 4531.03. Nearby orange to red dwarf star (K-M4.5 V) in Vulpecula.
        • Ross 165 System (13.8 ly; 34.9 ly) - Ross 165 is also known as Gl 766. Nearby binary red dwarf star with a period of 81 years and average separation of 11.8 AU. The primary star is also known as G 185-37 and LHS 478.

Mu Herculis Client KingdomEdit

0 Known Planets

  • Mu Herculis System (7.2 ly; 27.4 ly) - Mu Herculis is also known as Gl 695 and HR 6623. A Yellow Sub-Giant with up to three companion red dwarf stars. It serves as the "elbow" star in the constellation Hercules, known as "Marfak Al Jathih Al Aisr" (left elbow of kneeling man). It is also part of a Chinese asterism. Star A is also known as HD 161797. It has just a little bit more mass than the Sun and over 75% more its radius. Star B was discovered in 1781 by William Herschel and is also known as LHS 3325. Star C also exists in close coupling with star B at 11.4 AU away. Astrometric observations suggest a possible fourth red dwarf (D = Ab) exists near star A (=Aa) at 17.2 AU away. A brown dwarf or large jovian was also reported in 1994 due to astrometric effects, though this has not yet been confirmed through spectral analysis. The pair AD is 286 AU from the pair BC. The system is a member of the Wolf 630 group
        • BD+18°3421 System (4.5 ly; 26.4 ly) - BD+18°3421 is also known as LHS 452 and Gl 686. A red dwarf in Hercules.
        • Giclas 142-11 System (13.9 ly; 34.9 ly) - G 142-11 is also known as GJ 1232. A red dwarf in Sagittarius.

BD+38°3095 DuchyEdit

      • BD+38°3095 System (10.9 ly; 36.2 ly) - BD+38°3095 is also known as HR 6806, Gl 706, Hip 88972, and HD 166620. An orange dwarf in Hercules.
        • Gliese 4048 System (1.3 ly; 37.2 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 4048. Star A is also known as G 204-58 and LHS 462 and Star B is known as G 204-57 and LHS 461. Separated by 97 AU.
        • Gliese 4049 System (1.3 ly; 37.2 ly) - Nearby binary Red dwarf star known as NN 4049. Star A is also known as G 204-58 and LHS 462, while B is also G 204-57 and LHS 461.
        • Gliese 1223 System (3.2 ly; 39.1 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as G 182-36, GJ 1223, G 182-36, and LHS 457.
        • Gliese 4070 System (5.9 ly; 36.8 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as G 206-40 and NN 4070.
        • Gliese 4062 System (6.2 ly; 41.4 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as NN 4062 and G 205-28.
        • BD+43°2796 System (6.5 ly; 31 ly) - BD+43°2796 is also known as LHS 3321 and Gl 694. Nearby red dwarf star in Hercules.
        • Gliese 671 System (7.9 ly; 40.1 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as AC+41 726-154, Gl 671, Hip 84790, G 181-39, and LHS 3281.
        • Gliese 1234 System (8.7 ly; 38.1 ly) - Nearby white dwarf star known as G 125-03 and GJ 1234.
        • Gliese 4040 System (10.1 ly; 44.3 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as G 204-39, NN 4040, Hip 87938, and LHS 3343.
        • Gliese 4122 System (12.8 ly; 37.2 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as NN 4122, G 125-30, LTT 15769, L 1501-53, Hip 97241, and LP 337-3.
        • Gliese 1243 System (13.4 ly; 38.8 ly) - Nearby Red dwarf star known as G 208-42 and GJ 1242.

Chi Draconis Client KingdomEdit

0 Known Planets

  • Chi Draconis System (15.2 ly; 26.4 ly) - Chi Draconis is also known as Gl 713. Nearby yellow-white dwarf star (A) with an orange dwarf companion (B). Star A is also known as HR 6927 and HD 170153, and is a little bit more massive and larger than the Sun. Star B varies from 0.6 to 1.4 AU from the star, to close for a habitable planet, which would orbit at Mars-like distances from Star A. The stars' are significantly non-planar to each other. Star B was first detected by William Wright in 1898. The stars are about a billion years old.
        • LP 71-165 System (3.9 ly; 23.8 ly) - LP 71-165 is also known as G 258-33, NN 4053, and LHS 3376 . Nearby red dwarf star in Draco.
        • Giclas 227-29 System (5.1 ly; 26.7 ly) - G 227-29 is also known as GJ 1227, LP 103-305, and LHS 465. Nearby red dwarf star in Draco.
        • AC+65°6955 System (6.1 ly; 26.1 ly) - AC+65°6955 is also known as LHS 3558, Gl 793. Nearby red dwarf star in Draco. It was on the Sproul astrometric program since 1937.
        • Wolf 1069 System (10.1 ly; 30.3 ly) - Wolf 1069 is also known as GJ 1253 and LHS 3549. Nearby red dwarf star in Cygnus.

BD+74°1047 DuchyEdit

      • BD+74°1047 System (14.1 ly; 35.2 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star (A) and red dwarf star (B) known as BD+74°1047 and Gl 909. Star A is also known as HR 9038, Hip 117712, and HD 223778.
        • Gliese 3125 System (5.4 ly; 34.2 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 245-40, LP 30-55, and NN 3125.
        • Gliese 1053 System (9.4 ly; 39.4 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 221-5, GJ 1053, and LHS 18 .
        • Gliese 1238 System (9.8 ly; 35.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 261-6, GJ 1238, G 261-6, and LHS 3461.
        • AC+82°1111 System (10.6 ly; 30.6 ly) - AC+82°1111 is also known as LHS 215, Gl 226. Nearby red dwarf star in Camelopardalis.

Alsafi PrincipalityEdit

    • Alsafi System (8.2 ly; 18.9 ly) - Alsafi is also known as Sigma Draconis, HR 7462, Gl 764, and HD 185144. It's name is from derived from Arabic for a "cooking tripod" that nomads used. It has been reclassified in 2003 as a G9 Yellow Dwarf star (it was thought to be an orange dwarf). It has about 90% of the Sun's mass and 80% of its diameter. There appears to be a sunspot cycle, though its length is undetermined, and it was found to be the least variable of any of the stars observed by Hipparcos. It is thought to be 7 to 8 Billion Years old. It was a tier 1 target for Nasa's Terrestrial Planet Finder and a top target for ESA's Darwin project before both projects were put on indefinite hold. It was described as being the fourth easiest star to find terrestrial planets. No indication of any planets or dust disks have so far been detected. One of 5 PICTURE-C targets selected for sub-orbital coronograph observation.
        • LP 44-113 System (3.3 ly; 19.9 ly) - LP 44-113 is also known as EGGR 372, LHS 455, and GJ 1221. Seventh nearest white dwarf to the sun, located in Draco. Due to its lower temperature, it actually appears yellow to the naked eye, not white.
        • BD+61°2068 System (5.7 ly; 22.8 ly) - BD+61°2068 is also known as Gl 809. Nearby binary red dwarf in Cephus. Star A is also known as LHS 3595.
        • AC+79°3888 System (8.6 ly; 17.6 ly) - AC+79°3888 is also known as Gl 445. Nearby red dwarf in Camelopardalis. The star emits x-rays along with flares. It will be nearest to the solar system in 40,000 years at 3.45 light years (it will still be invisible to the naked eye). At the same time, Voyager 1 will pass 1.6 light years to this star.
        • AC+56°1646-56 System (9.5 ly; 21.5 ly) - AC+56°1646-56 is also known as G 202-48 and Gl 625. Nearby red dwarf in Draco. It was suspected of being a possible binary in 1977.

Archird PrincipalityEdit

    • Archird System (16.1 ly; 19.6 ly) - Archird is also known as Eta Cassiopeiae and Gliese 34. Nearby yellow dwarf star (A) orbited by an orange dwarf star (B). It is the brightest star near the lines formed by the "W" of the constellation. Star A is also known as HR 219, LHS 123, and HD 4614, while Star B is also known as LHS 122. Star A is about the same size, mass, and age as the Sun, but only about 65% as metal rich. It represents what the Sun might look like from Archird. Its habitable zone is centered on 1.35 AU. At one time, Star A was thought to have a spectroscopic binary companion with a nine day orbit period. Star B may have first been discovered by William Hershel in 1779 two years prior to discovering Uranus, while he was seeking nearby double stars for parallax studies. Star B ranges from 36 to 107 AU. It has 56% of the Sun's mass and 66% it diameter, but only 3% its luminosity. Radial velocity variations have been detected, though no planet has been announced at this time. The system is a top tier target for TPF. In Star Trek, this is home to Terra Nova.
        • Stein 2051 System (9.1 ly; 17.9 ly) - Stein 2051 is also called Gl 169.1. It is a binary star system consisting of a Red Dwarf (A) and a White Dwarf (B) separated by 39 AU in Camelopardalis. It is the nearest system of this configuration. Star A is the brighter of the two stars, but B is the more massive. Star A is also known as LHS 26. A vast asteroid belt exists around Star A at 2 AU. A small companion, probably a brown dwarf, but possibly small red dwarf, orbits Star A further out at 4.8 AU. Star B is also called G 175-34 and LHS 27.

BD+56°2966 DuchyEdit

      • BD+56°2966 System (4.9 ly; 21.2 ly) - BD+56°2966 is also known as Gl 892, HR 8832, and HD 219134. Nearby orange dwarf star and flare star. Its habitable zone is centered at 0.46 AU. It was a top tier target for the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions. It might have a red dwarf companion.
        • BD+43°4305 System (6.4 ly; 16.3 ly) - BD+43°4305 is also known as Gl 873 and informally as Proxima Lacertae. It is a very active and well observed flare star known as EV Lacertae. It was observed by the SWIFT satellite emitting the largest flare observed in the solar neighborhood in 2008. It was the brightest as seen from Earth around any star other than the Sun and would have made the star visible to the naked eye for one to two hours. Such a flare would strip the atmosphere off of a life bearing planet. This offered proof that the star was indeed young and had a much stronger magnetic field than the Sun. Magnetic double layers from this star probably extend for thousands of light years. The star has 28% of the Sun's mass, 38% of its radius, and is normally a magnitude 11.7 star. The rotates in only 4.4 days and is about 100 mllion years old. It is covered in dark star spots. In the 1970's and 80's, it was suggested that some of the flare activity could be explained by a further out red dwarf or brown dwarf companion exists in a 45 year orbit. This has not been confirmed.

Rutilicus Client KingdomEdit

1 Known Planet

  • Rutilicus System (16.1 ly; 35.2 ly) - Rutilicus is also known as Ruticulus (though this name can also refer to Beta Herculis), Zeta Herculis, and Gl 635. Nearby binary star system. Star A is a yellow-white or yellow sub-giant star. It is 50% more massive than the Sun, over twice its radius, and is about the same age. It probably began as a white or yellow white main sequence star. It is also known as HR 6212 and HD 150680. Star B is on the boarder between a yellow and orange dwarf star. It ranges from 7.8 to 21 AU away and was discovered by William Hershel in 1782. The star was once thought to be a member of the Zeta Herculis stellar moving group, but has since been removed as being too metal rich and the group renamed the Zeta Reticuli group. Star A has long been suspected of having a brown dwarf companion due to orbital peculiarities seen in Stars A and B.
        • Gliese 3966 System (3.4 ly; 37.5 ly) - Nearby red dwarf known as LP 275-68 and NN 3966.
        • [1] BD+25°3173 System (4.4 ly; 33.6 ly) - BD+25°3173 is also known as Gl 649, Hip 83043, G 169-38, LHS 3257, V 785. Nearby relatively bright red dwarf in Hercules. Has a Saturn-mass planet in an eccentric orbit centered on 1.15 AU with a period of 598 days. It was was discovered in 2009 and only the 7th dopplar detected planet around a red dwarf, and one of the few known Jovians around a red dwarf. The planet would be as cold as a planet at Jupiter-like distances from the Sun.
        • Gliese 3928 System (6 ly; 35.5 ly) - Nearby red dwarf known as G 180-11 and NN 3928.
        • Giclas 169-29 System (6 ly; 32.6 ly) - G 169-29 is also known as NN 3976. Nearby red dwarf in Hercules.
        • Gliese 3992 System (7.4 ly; 39.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf known as NN 3992, LTT 15087, Hip 84099, and Wolf 654.
        • Gliese 669 System (7.7 ly; 39.1 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as Ross 868 and Gl 669. Star A is also known as Hip 84794 and G 170-35, while star B is a variable star also known as G 170-34 and Gl 867.

BD+33°2777 PrincipalityEdit

      • BD+33°2777 System (3.4 ly; 31.9 ly) - BD+33°2777 is also known as Gl 638, HIP 82003, NSV 7951, and HD 151288. Nearby orange dwarf star in Hercules.
        • Giclas 180-60 System (4.4 ly; 32.6 ly) - G 180-60 is also known as NN 3959. Nearby red dwarf star.
        • AC+48°1595-89 System (6.7 ly; 26.1 ly) - AC+48°1595-89 is also known as Gl 623 and LHS 417. Nearby binary red dwarf star in Hercules separated by 1.9 AU. It was photographed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Faint Object Camera in 1994.
        • Giclas 203-42 System (10.1 ly; 31 ly) - G 203-42 is also known as NN 3988 and LHS 3262. Nearby red dwarf star in Draco.

Pollux KingdomEdit

6 Known Planets in 2 Systems

  • [1] Pollux System (54.5 ly; 33.6 ly) - Pollux is also known as Beta Geminorum, HR 2990, HD 62509, and Gl 286. It was originally called Polydeuces by the Greeks, after the immortal twin. The brightest star in Geminorum, which suggests it may have used to be the second brightest four centuries ago, and is the 17th brightest star in the sky. It is an orange-red giant star (K0 III) 1.7 times the Sun's mass and 8.8 its diameter and 724 MYO. It is the nearest (34 ly) giant star to the Sun. Its spectra has been used as a stable anchor point since 1943. It has one of the weakest measured magnetic field of any star. Planet Thestias was confirmed in 2006 that was first suspected in 1993. It orbits 1.64 AU in a circular path and is at least 2.3 times as massive as Jupiter. This is much nearer than the present habitable zone, which is centered at 5.7 AU. This is the brightest star in the sky known to have a planet. One of the first 20 exoplanet systems allowed to be given common names by the IAU. Named after the mother of Pollux, Leda. However, Leda is already taken as a moon of Jupiter, so a name derived from her father is used, which is sometimes used to refer to her or her sister..
        • Gliese 277 System (6.4 ly; 37.2 ly) - Nearby triple red dwarf in Lynx known as VV Lyncis and Gl 277. Star A is also a spectroscopic binary known as HIP 36626, BD+36 1638, G 87-44, and V 246. Star B is also known as Ross 989 and G 87-43.
        • BD+27°1348 System (7.7 ly; 40.1 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as BD+27°1348, Wo 9227, Gl 268.3, Hip 35191, G 109-55, and V 490.
        • Gliese 2069 System (9.1 ly; 28.7 ly) - Nearby possible five red dwarf star system or two separate systems nearby in the sky known as GJ 2069 and CU Cancri. Star A is divided into two parts, Aa, and Ab, and is also known as G 40-25. Star Aa is known as G 9-8, HIP 41824, and L1251-13, while star Ab is also known as G 40-26, and L1251-12. This was discovered to be the third known eclipsing binary system in 1999. This gave the most accurate mass for red dwarfs to date, and the first for an intermediary massed red dwarfs. A fifth star D was reported in 2000. The system is a member of the Castor Moving Group, giving an estimated age of 320 Million Years Old. The system is somewhat fainter than other stars of similar mass, providing evidence that there may be some light absorption by an undetected circumstellar disk. A flare was detected in 2009 and it was found to have one of the most energetic magnetic fields, and covered in many star spots.

Rho Cancri PrincipalityEdit

    • [5] Rho Cancri System (12.1 ly; 40.8 ly) - Copernicus is also known as Rho Cancri, 55 Cancri, Rho1 Cancri, HR 3522, Gl 324, and HD 75732. Wide binary star consisting of a sun-like primary (A, though super metal rich) and a red-dwarf secondary (B) separated by 1,100 AU, 41 light years away. Star A contains five exoplanets, the first system found with four or five planets. It has three tightly packed eccentric planets close in to the star, including planet Jannsen (e, hot Super Earth/Neptunian), Galileo (b, warm Jupiter), and Brahe (c, hot Saturn), followed by an eccentric Saturn in the habitable zone (Harriot, f) and a Jupiter analog, Lippershey (d). Planet e was heralded as the first Neptunian discovered. It was later found to be the shortest-period planet discovered (18 hours) and to transit. Its density was measured and determined to be rocky, and thus re-dubbed the first Super-Earth discovered. It was then the first super-Earth to have its light detected (by Spitzer in the infrared). The planet has about half of Neptune's mass, but is Earth-like in size and density (2.17 Earth Radius). Studies taking into account the composition of the star suggested that it was largely made of diamond, with graphite at the surface (the first diamond planet around a Sunlike star), and the first terrestrial found with fundamentally different surface composition and processes than Earth. This was later refuted when it turned out there wasn't as much carbon in the parent star as believed. Earlier studies that assumed an Earth-like composition suggested that it would be covered with an ocean of super-critical water. The brightness of the planet was found to have raised dramatically, possibly the aftermath of cloud cover due to a volcanic eruption. The brightness of the star (also closest known to transit and only known naked eye star to do so) makes it more easily studied than other hot super Earths. It was found to be dark and its sun-facing side hot enough to melt metal. It became the first super Earth to have its atmospheric composition measured (mostly hydrogen and helium with hints of hydrogen cyanide which would only dominate in a carbon-rich environment and no traces of water vapor) and temperature mapped, and the large hemispherical temperature differences suggest little atmosphere to transport heat. Planet b (one of the original 4 Hot Jupiters discovered) is the first "warm Jupiter" found to have a puffed up atmosphere and it probably at the outer limit from the star at which a planet can lose its atmosphere in this way. Its outer atmosphere skims the surface of the star, which was detected when attempting to detect an atmosphere around transiting Janssen. The strong interaction between planets Galileo and Brahe can be detected in measurements, and it took a while to find a fit that would allow them to survive over long periods of time. Harriot is a very eccentric Saturnian in the habitable zone. Planet d is a super jovian at Jupiter-like distances, which was the first found at true Jupiter distances and still the exoplanet discovered with dopplar spectrometry with the largest known semi-major axis. It was first thought to be circular, then eccentric, and then circular again. The distant outer star causes Lippershey's axis to flip on its axis every million years. Lippershey in turn causes the other planets to flip, including its star. The axis tilt of transiting planet e should be determined at some point. "Bode's law" predicts four undiscovered planets. One of the first 20 exoplanet systems allowed to be given common names by the IAU.
        • Gliese 359 System (8.8 ly; 39.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Ross 92, Gl 359, and G 49-20, LHS 2171.

Denebola KingdomEdit

  • Denebola System (47.2 ly; 36.2 ly) - Denebola is also known as Beta Leonis, HR 4534, Gl 448, and HD 102647. It is the second brightest star in Leo and its name refers to the tail of the Lion. It is a white main sequence star, twice the Sun's mass with 50% more of its radius. It is a Delta Scuti type variable star, meaning that its magnitude varies very slightly over a period of a few hours. It has a circumstellar disk caused by collisions of smaller planetary bodies. This was first detected by excess infrared radiation detected in 1983. It is thought that one band starts at 0.13 to 0.43 AU, and another further out at 13 AU to 19 AU. The habitable zone ranges from 2.3 to 4.8 AU. It is part of the stellar association dubbed the IC 2391 supercluster.
        • Gliese 452.1 System (3.8 ly; 33.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Ross 119, Wo 9375, Gl 452.1, G 12-4, and LHS 2472.
        • Gliese 3667 System (8.3 ly; 28.7 ly) - WD 1126+185 is also known as NN 3667 and PG 1126+185. Nearby white dwarf star. In 2003, parallax measurements (near zero, therefore, must be distant) gave results inconsistant with it being classed as a white dwarf star or a nearby object.

Alula Australis PrincipalityEdit

    • Alula Australis System (11.4 ly; 33.9 ly) - Alula Australis is also known as Xi Ursae Majoris, HR 4375, and Gl 423. Its name means "southern first spring". Nearby possible quadruple star system, consisting of two yellow dwarf stars with low mass spectroscopic companions. This was the first binary star found to be orbiting each other, found by William Herschel in 1780. Star A straddles the line between a white-yellow and a yellow dwarf star, is slightly more massive, and slightly smaller than the Sun. It is thought to be about 2 Billion years old and classified as a RS Canum Venaticorum variable type star. Star A is a spectroscopic binary, with star Ab orbiting from 0.8 to 2.6 AU, making any habitable planetary orbit unstable. Star B is another yellow dwarf star, about 90% as massive and as large as the Sun. It may be orbited by a brown dwarf or low mass red dwarf (Bb) in a torch orbit. The pair is separated from Stars A by 12.5 to 39.9 AU. A fifth orange dwarf Bc component has been suspected at 450 AU, but appears not to move with the system. A second brown dwarf (T class) in the system was found in 2012 sharing the system's motion at 4000 AU.
        • Luyten 1545-74 System (4.4 ly; 31.9 ly) - L 1545-74 is also known as GJ 1138 and LHS 293. Nearby red dwarf star in Leo.
        • Gliese 436 System (4.5 ly; 33.3 ly) - AC+27°28217 is best known as Gliese 436. The second known red dwarf planetary system. Contains one of the first Neptunians discovered and a few potential planets. The star is about half the sun's mass. It is over 11 Billion years old and may be a part of the old disk of the Milky Way. Planet b temporarily later found to be the smallest exoplanet (about Uranus' diameter, though over 50% its mass) known to transit its host star and is currently the nearest (33 ly). Its temperature (712K) was measured to be higher than what it would be purely from radiation (520K), perhaps due to a greenhouse effect, somewhat higher than Venus. It was originally thought to have a layer of "hot ice", water solidified due to high pressures. It turned out that it was larger than thought and hot ice was not needed. It could still be a rocky super-Earth. It was later found to have a remarkably low levels of Methane and high levels of Carbon Monoxide for its 800K temperature. Possible explanations include Methane being changed into hydrocarbon polymers due to its star's ultraviolet radiation, CO being drafted upwards with winds, or observational defects. Later, due to lack of detection of chemical signatures through the backlit atmosphere, it was concluded that high altitude clouds, perhaps made of potassium chloride or zink sulphide dust, were blocking the detection. This could be the first detection of clouds of a Neptunian. An alternate theory is that the atmosphere is filled with heavy compounds, such as water, carbond dioxide, which would compress the atmosphere and make it difficult to detect. After detection of a huge comet-like tail of Hydrogen trailing and wrapping around its orbit led to the most recent theory that it lost its Hydrogen to uv radiation and was left with a Helium dominated atmosphere with plenty of CO instead of CH4. It's significant eccentricity suggests a possible neighboring planet. Planet c was announced to be the smallest known exoplanet (1.5 Earth's diameter), but was later retracted because variations in transit timing of the first planet did not occur and the proposed orbit would be unstable. It is still thought that a second planet of some kind is possible in the system. Candidate UCF-1.01 was detected by a student in the UCF's astronomy department using the Spitzer Space Telescope. It is about 2/3 Earth's diameter (smaller than all but one confirmed exoplanet), orbits around its star in 1.5 days, and at 1000F may be a lava world without an atmosphere. UCF-1.02 also may exist. Both are thought to be about 1/3 as massive as the Earth, but are too small to get their mass measured and thus too small to be confirmed with present technology.
        • Gliese 1134 System (5.7 ly; 33.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as GJ 1134, G 146-58, and LHS 287.
      • Gliese 414 System (5 ly; 38.8 ly) - Nearby binary star known as BD+31°2240 and Gl 414 in Ursa Majoris. Orange dwarf star A is also known as Hip 54646 and HD 97101. Red dwarf star B is also known as BD+31°2238, G 119-59, and LHS 2366.
        • Gliese 3647 System (2.4 ly; 39.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf flare star known as G 119-62, NN 3647, and CW UMa.
      • BD+22°2302 System (7.4 ly; 38.1 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Leo known as BD+22°2302, Gl 410, Hip 53985, HD 95650. Sometimes classed as an orange dwarf, others a red dwarf.
        • Gliese 403 System (5.6 ly; 38.8 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as G 44-42, Gl 403, G 44-42, and LHS 295.
        • Gliese 427 System (7.1 ly; 44 ly) - Nearby white dwarf star known as Ross 627, Gl 427, G 120-45, LHS 304, and EG 79. It is the original prototype for the DA,F spectral class and heavily studied and modeled.

61 Ursae Majoris PrincipalityEdit

    • 61 Ursae Majoris System (12.4 ly; 31 ly) - 61 UMa is also known as HR 4496, Gl 434, HD 101501, and NSV 5291. Nearby late yellow dwarf star. It is just barely visible to the naked eye. Its spectrum has been used as a stable anchor point since 1943. Its chromospheric activity suggests it younger than 500 Million Years old, but its lack of an easily observable disk suggests it is over 1 Billion years old. Lack of detection of large planets in tight orbits bodes well for finding a future habitable planet. Its variability was studied in 1953 in hopes of finding it was an eclipsing binary. It lies in the same line of sight as the sub-giant star HD 101212, though it is unclear if these are gravitationally bound or even in proximity of each other. In Star Trek, this is the system the planet Archer IV belongs to.

Groombridge 1830 PrincipalityEdit

    • Groombridge 1830 System (14.5 ly; 30 ly) - Groombridge 1830 is also known as HR 4550, HD 103095, and Gl 451. Nearby dim yellow subdwarf star. It was first mentioned in Groombridge's catalog of circumpolar stars. It was found to have the highest proper motion of any star by Argelander in 1842 (replacing 61 Cygni), and is now known to have the third highest. It is likely a halo star, and has not evolved onto the main sequence despite its old age 5 or 10 billion years old. Being a halo star that does not follow the rotation of the galaxy explains its high proper motion. It is part of the Groombridge 1830 Moving Group, which consists of several other subdwarf stars. Van de Kamp recorded a flare which he assumed was a dim companion star. It has since been found to undergo superflares.
        • BD+36°2219 System (2.3 ly; 28 ly) - BD+36°2219 is also known as G 148-13 and Gl 450. Nearby red dwarf star in Ursa Major. Possible spectroscopic binary.
        • Gliese 1148 System (6.8 ly; 35.9 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Ross 1003, GJ 1148, Hip 57050, G 122-40, and LHS 2443.

Chara PrincipalityEdit

    • Chara System (17.8 ly; 27.4 ly) - Chara is also known as Beta Canum Venaticorum, Asterion, HR 4785, Gl 475, and HD 109358. Together with Cor Caroli, it forms the "Southern Dog" portion of the Hunting Dogs constellation. Its name Chara (Greek for "joy") used to apply to both stars, but is now only applied to this one. Nearby yellow dwarf star and Solar analog. It is slightly older than the Sun and rotates at a similar speed as the Sun. X-Rays have been detected, as would be expected. It was named in 2003 to be the most likely sun-like star old enough to produce a radio-wave producing civilization. An unconfirmed spectroscopic companion star with a 2,430 day period has been claimed.
        • Giclas 122-49 System (5.1 ly; 26.7 ly) - G 122-49 is also known as LHS 316 and GJ 1151. Nearby red dwarf star in Ursa Major.
      • BD+48°2108 System (8.6 ly; 33.9 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star in Canes Venatici known as BD+48°2108, Gl 508, Hip 65026, and HD 115953. Has a red dwarf companion star.
        • Gliese 537 System (5.3 ly; 36.5 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as BD+47 2112 and Gl 537. Star A is also known as G 200-16, LHS 2849, V 706 while Star B is also known as LHS 2850.
        • BD+36°2393 System (7.9 ly; 35.5 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as Gl 519, Hip 66459, BD+36°2393, G 165-19, and V 49. Possible spectroscopic binary star.
      • BD+62°1325 System (13.5 ly; 32.9 ly) - Nearby orange dwarf star known as BD+62°1325, HR 5256, Hip 68184, and HD 122064. Nearby orange dwarf star in Ursa Major.
        • LP 98-79 System (2.9 ly; 31.6 ly) - LP 98-79 is also known as GJ 3855 and LHS 2930. Nearby red dwarf flare star in Draco.
        • LTT 14363 System (3.9 ly; 32.3 ly) - LTT 14363 is also known as Wo 9492, AC +66°4437, and G 239-25. Nearby red dwarf star in Ursa Major.
        • Gliese 487 System (5 ly; 33.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf flare star also known as HIP 62556. Its documented distance of under 100 light years is due to a Hipparcos error.
        • Gliese 1187 System (6.5 ly; 36.5 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as GJ 1187, G 201-27, and LHS 3006.
        • Gliese 424 System (10.3 ly; 29.7 ly) - Gl 424 is also known as HIP 55360. Nearby red dwarf star in Ursa Major. Its given distance of under 10 parsecs is due to a Hipparcos error.
      • Struve 1321 System (15.8 ly; 20.5 ly) - Struve 1321 is also known as Gl 338, Sigma 1321, and HD 79210. Nearby double system of late orange dwarf flare stars. First observed as a binary star by Struve in 1817. They are separated on average by 108 AUs. Star A is also known as HD 79210, while B is also known as HD 79211. In the 1970s and 1980s, each star was thought to have an unseen companion per radial velocity measurements, which have since been disproved.
        • Luyten 97-12 System (9.1 ly; 26.7 ly) - GJ 1105 is also known as HIP 38956, G 111-47, L 97-12, and LHS 1963. Nearby red dwarf star in Lynx. Its distance of under 10 parsecs is due to a Hipparcos error.
        • Ross 986 System (9.1 ly; 20.9 ly) - Ross 986 is also known as Gl 268. Nearby binary red dwarf star in Auriga. Star A is a flare star known as QY Aurigae. Star B is A's spectroscopic binary pair and they orbit each other in 10.4 days. The pair form a RS Canum Venaticorum variable star, which are two stars whose brightness varies due to their strong magnetic fields due to their rapid rotation, which is accelerated due to tidal effects caused by their proximity. Ultra-precise mass measurements were obtained in 2008. Precise orbital measurements taken in 2012 are the best for any visual binary and compete with the best measurements taken for eclipsing binaries.
        • Gliese 3417 System (9.3 ly; 25.4 ly) - Nearby binary red dwarf star known as G 250-31, LHS 1885, and GJ 3417. Once thought to be within 10 parsecs, now thought to be 37.3 ly away.

Zavijava Client KingdomEdit

  • Zavijava System (8 ly; 35.5 ly) - Zavijava is also known as Beta Virginis, Alaraph, HR 4540, HD 102870, and Gl 449. Actually the fifth brightest star in Virgo, named for the "corner/kennel" of the Arab Dogs. This is the star that Einstein used to calculate the speed of light with during a solar eclipse, as it was close to the sun. Yellow-white main sequence star that is about to evolve into a sub-giant star. Has about 1.3 times the Sun's mass and 1.7 its radius. Its current habitable zone is 1.87 AU, although it has recently shifted outwards. Jovian planets were suspected in 1998, but none have been confirmed. Has two optical companions and is suspected of being a spectroscopic binary.
        • LTT 13408 System (8.5 ly; 27.7 ly) - LTT 13408 is a nearby red dwarf flare star in Virgo also known as G 13-12, LHS 2531, and GJ 1154 A. Another red dwarf orbits it observed at 42 AU away. It has an optical companion GJ 1154 B.
        • Gliese 3693 System (11.3 ly; 46.3 ly) - Nearby red dwarf star known as NN 3693 and LP 553-59.
        • BD+01°2447 System (15.5 ly; 23.5 ly) - BD+01°2447 is a red dwarf star in Sextans also known as LHS 2272, G 162-60, HIP 51317, Ross 446, and Gl 393. An AB Doradus moving group member.
        • BD-03°2870 System (16.5 ly; 25.4 ly) - BD-03°2870 is a nearby possibly binary red dwarf star system in Sextans also known as LTT 3734, Gl 382, and HIP 49986. The companion, if it exists, is separated by 200 AU. It is sometimes used as a standard star for M2 stars.
        • Luyten 1038-28 System (20.4 ly; 31.6 ly) - L 1038-28 is also known as Gl 1125, HIP 46655, G 48-20, and LHS 2149. Red Dwarf variable star in Hydra.

Porrima Client KingdomEdit

  • Porrima System (13.7 ly; 38.5 ly) - Porrima is also known as Gamma Virginis, Arich, and Gl 482. Named after two of two ancient sister goddesses of prophesy. A twin pair of bright Yellow-white main sequence stars (both F0 V) in Virgo. Star A is also known as HR 4825 and HD 110379, and Star B is known as HR 4826 and HD 110380.

61 Virginis PrincipalityEdit

    • [3] 61 Virginis System (15.4 ly; 27.7 ly) - A system containing a 5.1 ME Hot Super-Earth b (which is hot enough to have emissions on its night side) and one and possibly two other further out Neptunians (c and d [unconfirmed] and possibly a fourth), and a massive Kuiper Belt around a very Sun-like star only 28 light years away. All planets would fit inside Venus' orbit and have high eccentricities, especially the outermost one. This is the closest planetary system around a G-type star, which is one of the only very sun-like stars visible to the naked eye. It is the first non-borderline G-class main sequence star found to have a super-Earth. A lack of a Jovian planet and an unseen further out Neptunian may explain the large amount of cometary debris detected. Systems like this may avoid a heavy bombardment period, but instead undergo a steady rain of occasional cometary impacts for billions of year. Of the six sunlike stars within 10 parsecs, this star would be the one most likely to have an older version of Earth orbiting it. This postulated planet would have only microbes left as its star became hotter.

Arcturus KingdomEdit

Gamma Serpentis Client KingdomEdit

Beta Pictoris Client KingdomEdit

(Client Kingdom of What?)

  • Beta Pictoris System - Young massive star with the first discovered circumstellar disk and the source of most interstellar meteorites in the Solar System. Comet crystals were found to be similar composition as those in Solar System. The first exo-comet was discovered in this system in 1983 and is the only star known with a detected comet known to also have a planet. Hundreds of comets detected by transit, of which on average of 6 transits occur in a 30 minute spetra, have been placed into two groups. One family (Population D for "deep" absorption lines) were older comets depleted of their volatiles and trapped in mean motion resonance with planet b or another undiscovered one. The other is fresher (Population S for "shallow"), emit more dust, follow similar orbits, and may have been formed after the breakup of a larger object. Contains the youngest known exo-planet, which shows that Jupiter-like planets can form much quicker than previously believed. It is the closest-in exoplanet photographed and is at 8 AU and 7-11 Jupiter Masses and orbits in 20 years. This planet was first hinted at by studying dust disks in 2003 and first photographed in 2003, but it was not confirmed and was lost. It was imaged again in 2008, and became the first imaged exoplanet confirmed to move around its star in 2010. It has an effective temperature of 1,100 to 1,700C, showing that it is still warm and has retained much of its heat from its formation. Evidence of a planetary transit in 1981 was found in record. It was originally thought that a second planet must have caused a tilt in one of the disks, but now it known that the first planet is. Models show that it could create waves and spirals in the disk. Some data suggests the planet is unusually wide, perhaps evidence of a ring system around it. The planet is traveling through a relatively dust-free gap in the debris disk, and thought to be clearing it. The planet is losing momentum as it travels through the debris disk. A large belt of carbon monoxide 50-160 AU concentrated at 85 AU has been observed, possibly caused by collision of comets. A Saturn sized planet interior to the belt that is not currently detectable due to being edge on in the disk could be shepherding it. It is possible that diamond-planets are forming in the disk. A cubesat could target this star in search of a second planet using the transit method since the system is edge-on. Principle member of the Beta Pictoris Moving Group.

Zeta Doradus KingdomEdit

(Client Kingdom of What?)


See AlsoEdit

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